Meetings must be minuted and the minutes approved ...

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loviii

Senior Member
Russian
Meetings must be minuted and the minutes approved at the following meeting.

Is this reduction of:

Meetings must be minuted and the minutes must be approved at the following meeting.
 
  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    "Meetings must be minuted " is, of course, an example of the worst in mindlessly jargonizing and otherwise abusing the English language by turning every noun into a verb.:eek::eek:

    "Minute" is recognized as a verb in our dictionary, but I never, ever, would use it that way nor accept it from minions under my editorial direction.:mad:
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I agree with sdgraham. "Must be minuted" is terrible. "Meetings must be recorded" sounds much better to me. If you're worried about possible confusion arising from "recorded", you might consider "Someone must make notes of what happens during meetings."
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Perhaps it’s an AE/BE difference then? Although I don’t really think it is. This is Oxford’s relevant definition:

    MINUTE
    verb [WITH OBJECT]
    Record (the proceedings of a meeting)

    ‘the Secretary shall minute the proceedings of each meeting’

    EDIT: Having said that, I admit that I would only ever use “take the minutes” [at a meeting] myself. But it didn’t occur to me that anyone would take exception to the usage in the OP.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Sometimes members don't agree with something that somebody else approves of in a dictionary's definition of some word. It is obvious that you see no problem with "minuted", but sdgraham and I do.

    I'm glad to see that you supplemented your opinion with the material you added in the latest comment in that post, lingobingo.;)
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    There are three examples in the COCA corpus of minute as a verb.
    On the other hand, there are 37 examples in the BNC.

    This may perhaps indicate that it is more common in BE, although I have my doubts.

    I would also have thought that speakers of AE are more likely to turn nouns into verbs than speakers of BE, although I have no evidence of this. :)
     
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