Meir Sternberg - pronunciation

il-y-a

New Member
Farsi - Iran
Hi,

I need to know how this name (Meir Sternberg) is pronounced in Hebrew. A notation in IPA would be great.

Thanks.
 
  • Abaye

    Senior Member
    Hebrew
    More likely Shterenberg, we're not so good with 3-consonant clusters. E.g. Herzel and not Herzl.
     

    Drink

    Senior Member
    English - New England, Russian - Moscow
    Also note that in Yiddish, unlike Standard German, words like shtern that end in -rn, are always pronounced shteren. In other words, the "n" is vocalic even after "r".

    Most likely that is the reason for Shterenberg in Hebrew, not as much as the difficulty of the consonant cluster.
     

    Abaye

    Senior Member
    Hebrew
    Most likely that is the reason for Shterenberg in Hebrew, not as much as the difficulty of the consonant cluster.
    We have Herzel instead of Herzl, Perelmutter instead of Perlmutter, and alike with vowel inserted unrelated to -rn.
     

    Drink

    Senior Member
    English - New England, Russian - Moscow
    Let me clarify a little more:

    In Yiddish, "-n" is vocalic after a consonant. Vocalic -n is pronounced very similarly to -en (and in German it is even written -en). For example: In אַלטע זאַכן (alte zakhn), the -n is pronounced like a vowel, very similar to "-en". So therefore in Hebrew this is pronounced alte zachen (with a much clearer "e", but nevertheless the same syllable structure).

    Same goes for -l. So words like ביסל (bisl), the -l is a vowel and is similar to -el, and so in Hebrew this would be pronounced bisel, but again with the same syllable structure. This goes for Hertzl as well.

    The above two phenomena apply to Standard German as well, except that in Standard German, an "e" is usually written there.

    What's different in Yiddish is after the letter "r".

    In Standard German, words like Stern are pronounced as one syllable. In other words, the -n is not vocalic (instead the -r may be vocalic and form a diphthong). In Yiddish, however, it is pronounced as two syllables. The "r" is a pure consonant, even in dialects where it can vocalized, while the "n" is vocalic. So it is pronounced similar to shteren. And thus it is also pronounced shteren in Hebrew.

    And same goes for the -rl ending as in perl. In Standard German, in words like this (e.g. geperlt), there is no extra syllable. In Yiddish, there is, and it transfers over to Hebrew.

    If you want to compare, I recommend you look at how Hebrew borrows English words that end in -rn. Since in English, -rn does not create a second syllable, since the r is vocalic (while -rl in English does create a second syllable). So for example, do you say "cornflakes" as "kornfleyks" or as "korenfleyks"?
     
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