Menée 6-1, 2-0 sans avoir existé

< Previous | Next >

zephyr707

New Member
English - USA
hi there,

If someone could please help me understand the sentence below:

"Menée 6-1, 2-0 sans avoir existé, l’ex-numéro 1 mondiale a soudain retrouvé son jeu et en particulier son service."

from this le monde article. I'm mostly concerned with the bolded and underlined part, the rest of the sentence makes sense to me. I don't understand the use of "menée" or the phrase "sans avoir existé" here. It seems to be something like "trailing 6-1, 2-0" and then "sans avoir existé" seems difficult to translate, but along the lines of minimal presence in play or not being able to contribute play, perhaps a specifically sport related phrase. What is also confusing is that "mener" seems to translate to "leading" in online dictionaries and translators.

Any help would be appreciated, thanks!
 
  • tartopom

    Senior Member
    French
    First she was behind 6-1, 2-0

    PS: I forgot 'sans avoir existé'.
    She was so terrible and played really so badly. Actually the beginning of the match looked as if there was only one player on the court: her opponent.
     
    Last edited:

    zephyr707

    New Member
    English - USA
    PS: I forgot 'sans avoir existé'.
    She was so terrible and played really so badly. Actually the beginning of the match looked as if there was only one player on the court: her opponent.
    yes that's the feeling I get as well despite it not being directly translatable. I searched around and saw it used in other one-sided sports contests where one team/player dominates the other.
     

    JiPiJou

    Senior Member
    French
    To go back to "mener" :
    Elle a mené de bout en bout et a remporté le match (voix active du verbe)
    Elle est menée 6-1, 2-0... mais peu à peu elle retrouve son jeu et son service. Et finalement elle gagne. (voix passive du verbe)
     

    Laurent2018

    Senior Member
    french belgium
    Maybe with no hope of winning
    Je ne pense pas: elle aurait essayé au moins de se défendre; ici elle n'a rien pu faire, elle a été "crushed" par son adversaire.
    L'expression "sans avoir existé" est terrible (proche de "nulle")
     

    zephyr707

    New Member
    English - USA
    To go back to "mener" :
    Elle a mené de bout en bout et a remporté le match (voix active du verbe)
    Elle est menée 6-1, 2-0... mais peu à peu elle retrouve son jeu et son service. Et finalement elle gagne. (voix passive du verbe)
    thanks, this is great at clarifying the difference
     

    Swatters

    Senior Member
    French - Belgium, some Wallo-Picard
    When used without an auxiliaire, the past participle always has this passive meaning. If the active meaning had been intended, the writer would have used the present participle instead (menant 6-1, 2-0).

    An alternative naming scheme for the participles exists where they're called the active and passive participles instead and I've always wished those were the terms that prevailed over present and past participles since they're more accurate to their usage as adjectives.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top