Mental preparation

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Silver

Senior Member
Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
Hi,


I got the term "mental preparation" for a long time, but I haven't used it before, I want to ask a question about it since I suppose that this phrase sounds a bit weird, here is a self-created context:


--Silver, you'd better make a mental preparation first, I have to tell you a bad new.

--Don't worry, just go right ahead.


A very good term to replace "mental preparation" is "psych up", but trust me I don't come here to waste your time, I really want to know whether the phrase is idiomatic for you?


Thanks
 
  • Tazzler

    Senior Member
    American English
    Well, if you were to use the noun, then you would use the plural "mental preparations". But more common would be to use the verb: "mentally prepare yourself". And then you can drop "mentally" because it's not needed. Also widely used is the verb "brace": "brace yourself". And instead of "new", the word you want is "news". :)
     

    HalfEmptyHero

    Member
    American English
    Something like "Mental preparation is key, if you want to pass this test" I could see being used. However, as Tazzler said, it would normally be "mentally prepare yourself" or "prepare yourself mentally."
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Well, if you were to use the noun, then you would use the plural "mental preparations". But more common would be to use the verb: "mentally prepare yourself". And then you can drop "mentally" because it's not needed. Also widely used is the verb "brace": "brace yourself". And instead of "new", the word you want is "news". :)
    I agree completely.
     
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