merge of two sentences

mahau

Senior Member
Lithuanian
Hello everybody,

I am a bit confussed about one sentence. I think I confuse German grammar with English grammar.
I told my friend: "Look, there are Michael and Simone (both are my classmates). They are standing very close to each other. Do you think they are going out together?"

First, would it be grammatically correct if I would write: "do you think are (do) they going (go) out together?" It sounds me very unusual.
Second, is the Simple Present possible here? I would use it if I knew they are a couple. The Simple Present refers me to the specific time of speach.
 
  • Man_from_India

    Senior Member
    India
    Transform your interrogative sentence into an assertive sentence:
    "You think that ...(simple sentence follows)"
    Now make it interrogative -
    "Do you think that ...(same simple sentence follows)"

    Example -
    1. You think that they are going to attend the party.
    2. Do you think that they are going to attend the party.

    You can omit "that" in those sentences. I used them for your better understanding.
    Hope this helps.
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    If I were speculating as to whether two people were a couple or not, I'd say:

    "Do you think (that) they're going out?"

    Together
    is unnecessary here and I wouldn't use the present simple either, generally speaking, if by to go out you mean to date/be a couple and not to leave/go out for a drink (or whatever).;)There will of course be exceptions to that.;)
     
    Last edited:

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I told my friend: "Look, there are Michael and Simone. They are standing very close to each other. Do you think they are going out together?"
    To me, this sentence is very nearly perfect—and unlike London Calling, I wouldn't suggest dropping "together". I'd suggest dropping "out". The speculation, if I understand you correctly, is not whether they're staying home or going out, but whether they're a couple; "going together" says that.
     

    mahau

    Senior Member
    Lithuanian
    To me, this sentence is very nearly perfect—and unlike London Calling, I wouldn't suggest dropping "together". I'd suggest dropping "out". The speculation, if I understand you correctly, is not whether they're staying home or going out, but whether they're a couple; "going together" says that.

    Thank you!
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    To me, this sentence is very nearly perfect—and unlike London Calling, I wouldn't suggest dropping "together". I'd suggest dropping "out". The speculation, if I understand you correctly, is not whether they're staying home or going out, but whether they're a couple; "going together" says that.
    An BE/AE difference? BE "going out together" = are a couple.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I think there's a BE/AE difference. If they're a couple, that means they're in a relationship; they may or may not do much going "out".

    "Item" in this sense hasn't been heard here in decades.
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I think there's a BE/AE difference. If they're a couple, that means they're in a relationship; they may or may not do much going "out".

    "Item" in this sense hasn't been heard here in decades.
    I find item dated as well.;)

    To go out in BE is the equivalent of to date.;) Together is redundant when it means that, as I mentioned above.;)
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    For me, do you think they're going out? = do you think that they are leaving the building, possibly on their way to a film or restaurant?

    For it to mean "in a steady relationship" it would have to have another word - either "together" or "going steady" (dated).
     
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