Merge together

M.laura9

New Member
Italian - Italy
Hi everybody!

I did a translation about tourism and I wrote " ancient and modern times merge together". I would like to know if it is correct to use this preposition after this verb or not. Is it unusual? I'm doing this question because in my translation "together" has been canceled, even though it exists. Can you help me? Thanks.
 
  • Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    " ancient and modern times merge together"
    Is that your complete sentence? Whether "merge together" is appropriate depends on context. It is used, but in the British National Corpus (a database of modern BE usage), "merge" without "together" is more than 100 times commoner than "merge together".
     

    M.laura9

    New Member
    Italian - Italy
    Is that your complete sentence? Whether "merge together" is appropriate depends on context. It is used, but in the British National Corpus (a database of modern BE usage), "merge" without "together" is more than 100 times commoner than "merge together".
    Walking around the luriant and green Salentinian countryside, you may come across these majestic stone pillars, one of the symbols of an ancient bygone era. In these places, ancient and modern times merge together and they offer not only the possibility to enjoy the natural surroundings principally, the Mediterranean scrub, but also to start a mesmerising journey which dates back to the stone age.

    It's the full text.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    To be strict, "merge" is not normally defined as "come together". Collins in the Wordreference dictionary:
    merge /mɜːdʒ/vb
    1. to meet and join or cause to meet and join
    2. to blend or cause to blend; fuse
    In your context I would use "merge together" as a deliberate stylistic choice.
     
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    M.laura9

    New Member
    Italian - Italy
    To be strict, "merge" is not normally defined as "come together". Collins in the Wordreference dictionary:In your context I would use "merge together" as a deliberare stylistic choice.
    So, it would be used just to emphasize the verb, right?
    Thank you for your answer :thumbsup:
     
    Hi Andy,
    I wasn't purporting to quote a dictionary, but just give the essence. Regarding your quotations; we can be even stricter in investigation, since the [your] first definition invokes 'join'. W-R dictionary gives these
    first three definitions:

    [join]
    1. to (cause to) come into or be in contact or connection with;
    2. to come into contact or union with:
    3. to (cause to) come together* in a particular relation or for a specific purpose; unite:

    So "come together" is explicitly mentioned in 3, and implied or suggested in 1. and 2. by such words as "come into... connection" or "come into ...union," respectively.

    *[my red, benny]

    One might note as well, M-W online, first two definitions:

    Simple Definition of merge
    • : to cause (two or more things, such as two companies) to come together* and become one thing : to join or unite (one thing) with another

    • : to become joined or united
    ===========
    *[my red, benny]
    Andy said: To be strict, "merge" is not normally defined as "come together". Collins in the Wordreference dictionary:
    merge /mɜːdʒ/vb
    1. to meet and join* or cause to meet and join
    2. to blend or cause to blend; fuse
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I don't see your point. The phrase "join together" has a long tradition in English, so a definition including "join" doesn't automatically include "together". Book of Common Prayer
    If any of you know cause, or just impediment, why these two persons should not be joined together in holy Matrimony, ye are to declare it.

    Those whom God hath joined together let no man put asunder.
    I don't use Merriam Webster - I don't speak AE.

    I do use the OED. The word "together" does not appear anywhere in its entry for "merge".

    I did not suggest that there is any requirement to use "together" in the text being asked about. I said that my stylistic choice would be to include it.
     
    Exactly. And a plausible reason that 'together' does not appear in OED (online) definitions or examples [no cases, online*, of 'merge together'] -- I propose--is that it's superfluous/unnecessary.

    I do use the OED. The word "together" does not appear anywhere in its entry for "merge".

    *Oxford. ADDED for clarity.
     
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    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    [no cases, online, of 'merge together']
    benny, I have already said that there are examples of "merge together" in the British National Corpus, an online resource. There are 29 examples in the Corpus of Contemporary American English, another online resource. "Merge together" appears increasingly in Google ngrams (another online resource) from 1840 with a current frequency 11 times greater than "antidisetablishmentarianism". I have just made a Google search for "merge together". The first four examples come from dictionary citations:
    Vocabulary.com "You know it's time to go to sleep when the words in your book begin to merge together."

    Cambridge English Dictionary "The blue and green paint merge together at the edges."

    Longman English Dictionary Online "The villages have grown and merged together over the years."

    Oxford Learner's Dictionaries "Fact and fiction merge together in his latest thriller."
    The latter two have entries specifically for "merge together". The use of "together" following "merge" is standard English. Whether or not to use "together" after "merge" depends on the intended meaning and on personal stylistic choice.
     
    Thanks for the examples, Andy. :) They aren't very common, but have occasionally, stylistic justification. 'merge' alone based on the ngram is, by my reckoning, more than 50 times as common, though with little data, judgment of proportions may be meaningless

    Google ngram for merge, merge together, join together, sesquipedalian

    Google Ngram Viewer
     
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    Hildy1

    Senior Member
    English - US and Canada
    A pedantic side note: in the example given, "together" is an adverb, not a preposition.
     
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