Mettre dans de sales draps

vplasgirl

Senior Member
Français - Canada
What would be the English equivalent of this French expression?

Tu vas finir par te mettre dans de sals draps.

Je pensais, You'll end up in deep waters, but I know there must be something better.

Merci d'avance,

Danie
 
  • vplasgirl

    Senior Member
    Français - Canada
    Yes! That's the one I was looking for, FranParis. Merci!

    And thanks to all of you for excellent suggestions. Deep sh.t is also bang on but probably too "raw" for the audience. Right Pickle I heard before. Isn't that a British expression?

    Thanks again,

    Danie
     

    Aoyama

    Senior Member
    français Clodoaldien
    Etre dans de sales draps c'est être aussi dans de beaux draps.
    Tout à fait.
    Mais To be in hot waters, correct selon le contexte, signifie plutôt "être en danger". Les draps, sales ou beaux, peuvent ne signifier qu'un problème plus simple, pas toujours un danger.
     

    FranParis

    Banned
    Français - France
    Je dirais quand même qu'être dans de beaux draps est moins grave qu'être dans de sales draps...

    A native American just told me that to be in hot waters is to be in trouble...
     

    basenjimere

    Member
    English-US
    Je dirais quand même qu'être dans de beaux draps est moins grave qu'être dans de sales draps...

    A native American just told me that to be in hot waters is to be in trouble...

    D'accord. You can say you're in hot water with someone (a parent for example) and it means you're in trouble, but not danger. While it could be used in a situation of danger, I've rarely heard it used that way.
     

    tamanoir

    Senior Member
    French France
    J'aime bien "to be in the soup", même si c'est une exclusivité de Bertie Wooster (le héros de PG Wodehouse):

    1) I could see no happy issue for him from the soup in which he was immersed. (Jeeves in the offing)

    2) 'Jeeves,' I said. 'Sir?' 'I rather fancy I'm in the soup, Jeeves.' 'Indeed, sir?' I eyed the man narrowly. Dashed aloof his manner was. Still brooding over the cummerbund. 'Yes. Right up to the hocks,' I said, suppressing the pride of the Woosters and trying to induce him to be a bit matter. 'Have you seen a girl popping about here with a parson brother?' 'Miss Hemmingway, sir? Yes, sir.' 'Aunt Agatha wants me to marry her.'
    (The inimitable Jeeves)

    3) It's rummy how some things don't go away when neglected. I mean to say, take a girl for instance, you had better be dashed careful not to neglect her or one morning she will have sailed for the colonies with a millionaire, and there you are, in the soup, supposing of course that your heart was really in it, and you were not secretly wishing to be well-shot of the whole business. (Jeeves and the blessed indiscretion)
     
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