Mi fuma il cervello

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  • Chrzaszcz Saproksyliczny

    Senior Member
    Polish - Prussia
    I have heard "czacha dymi" [the skull's smoking] in colloquial Polish, but I'm not sure if it's still in use. I think it meant situations where your brain is so confused or puzzled it smokes from overload.
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    That's it, indeed.

    We can koken (boil) metaphorically in Dutch, but then it is with anger, not due to effort: koken van woede. And my feeling is that it is more like the blood that is boiling, over the whole body.
     

    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    Your brain/head can overheat and explode can it not in English? That is, of course, metaphorically - if you stuff too much knowledge into them or you come across a piece of information which you can't digest (and don't want to!)

    Blood boiling seems to be international for anger - it applies in Cymraeg/Welsh and English, too.
     

    Chrzaszcz Saproksyliczny

    Senior Member
    Polish - Prussia
    Your brain/head can overheat and explode can it not in English? That is, of course, metaphorically - if you stuff too much knowledge into them or you come across a piece of information which you can't digest (and don't want to!)
    Isn't 'mind-blowing' a similar concept?
     

    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    Going by the analysis of Welsh translations of this expression, I think the suggestion, @ThomasK, is that it's the effect of some psychedelic drug which is 'blowing' your mind (clear) and your eyes are opened wide. (Not, fortunately, having had this experience, I believe that is what literally happens under these drugs' influence - your pupils dilate and you get some sort of 'cleansing' or extreme 'emptying' of your mind, where all other thoughts, ideas, perceptions etc., are 'blown away' as if by a mighty gust of wind. This, I guess, is what you try to replicate with subsequent 'fixes'.)
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    Well, I have Dutch friends, friends in the Netherlands, but they are not compatriots. ;-) I am basically a Dutch-speaking Belgian, a Vlaming.

    But Merriam-Webter's confirms your explanation, Welsh Sion!
     

    Rallino

    Moderatoúrkos
    Turkish
    In Turkish we have:

    Başı dumanlı (lit. His head is smoky) = he is in sorrow.

    Beynim yandı (lit. My brain is burnt) = I'm so confused.

    Blood boiling seems to be international for anger - it applies in Cymraeg/Welsh and English, too.
    Not in Turkish. We have the expression "blood boiling", but it means to start liking someone.

    Sana kanım kaynadı (lit. My blood has boiled to you) = I am actually starting to like you. You're a cool person.
     

    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    Merhaba @Rallino.

    Fair enough, I was using the term 'international' very, very loosely in the sense of covering the languages which we had already discussed above. I shouldn't imagine the same idiom with the same meaning covers the whole gamut of languages on Earth! (It would be interesting to know however if it's a common Indo-European thing however, as Turkish is not I-E. And, the converse, whether the Turkic languages share the same idiom/sense as yours.)
     

    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    I have seen the expression (in English) of having 'the blood sing (in your veins)' if you are very happy at achieving something or that someone has told you a very pleasing thing (like, 'I love you'). I always thought of this as an author's device, but can be told that it is indeed, a well-established English idiom/expression.

    I can't think of an equivalent in Cymraeg/Welsh - unless I were to translate verbatim.
     
    Last edited:

    Rallino

    Moderatoúrkos
    Turkish
    Merhaba @Rallino.

    Fair enough, I was using the term 'international' very, very loosely in the sense of covering the languages which we had already discussed above. I shouldn't imagine the same idiom with the same meaning covers the whole gamut of languages on Earth! (It would be interesting to know however if it's a common Indo-European thing however, as Turkish is not I-E. And, the converse, whether the Turkic languages share the same idiom/sense as yours.)
    Yeah I didn't mean to refute your theory. Blood boiling being a reference to anger is much more logical. It's pretty weird that, in TR, it means something completely different. I thought it'd be interesting to share, that's why.
     
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