Mi hijo está encaprichado

Galván

Senior Member
Spanish
Cómo diríais "mi hijo está encaprichado y no quiere obedecer"

Contexto: Mi hijo de 16 años se arrancó de casa con el pretexto de estar con sus amigos; finalmente nos enteramos de que se arrancó con su novia y no ha querido regresar a casa hace más de 6 semanas porque está encaprichado en no regresar y nos ha dicho que no irá a terapia familiar con nosotros a menos que aceptemos sus condiciones.

My son is set on his ways and doesn't want to obey

Gracias

Galván
 
  • elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    The expression is “set in his ways,” but that doesn’t fit here. It’s about someone’s general tendencies, beliefs, etc. It’s not about a specific instance.

    Suggestions:

    He’s sticking to his guns and won’t listen to us.
    He’s not budging and…
    He’s doubling down and…
     

    User With No Name

    Senior Member
    English - U.S. (Texas)
    It's a much freer translation, but I think what we would likely say in this situation is that he "is being stubborn."
     

    Galván

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    The expression is “set in his ways,” but that doesn’t fit here. It’s about someone’s general tendencies, beliefs, etc. It’s not about a specific instance.

    Suggestions:

    He’s sticking to his guns and won’t listen to us.
    He’s not budging and…
    He’s doubling down and…
    Thank you
     

    Bmm5045

    Senior Member
    USA - English (Northeast)
    Another idiom for this situation would be "he has drawn a line in the sand", meaning that he has made his demands and he's not willing to budge or concede anything.

    Another option would be "he has really dug his heels in".
     
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