Mi raccomando: giudizio

Pluscuam

New Member
Spanish
During his eulogy, Sassoli's son finished his speech saying: "Buona strada, papa. E mi raccomando: giudizio"
I can only come up with "Have a good trip, father. And I beg you: judgement" but I am afraid I am missing completely the point here.
Thanks for your help.
 
  • V. P.

    Member
    English/Italian bilingual
    During his eulogy, Sassoli's son finished his speech saying: "Buona strada, papa. E mi raccomando: giudizio"
    I can only come up with "Have a good trip, father. And I beg you: judgement" but I am afraid I am missing completely the point here.
    Thanks for your help.
    I'm not sure, but perhaps Sassoli's son used the word 'giudizio' as a synonym of 'saggezza'? So, in English: "Have a good journey dad, and don't forget: 'wisdom'!
     

    MR1492

    Senior Member
    English -USA
    During his eulogy, Sassoli's son finished his speech saying: "Buona strada, papa. E mi raccomando: giudizio"
    I can only come up with "Have a good trip, father. And I beg you: judgement" but I am afraid I am missing completely the point here.
    Thanks for your help.

    In contemporary AE, especially if he was trying to be humorous, it might be translated as, "Have a safe journey, Dad. And remember, don't do anything stupid." He might have meant "foolish" but the word "stupid" would have created a punchy ending.

    Phil
     

    MR1492

    Senior Member
    English -USA
    Giudizio here means common sense/good judgement.

    Thank you, Paul. As I said, I did not see the eulogy but the translation would depend upon his son's tone of voice, facial expression, and intention. If he was somber and serious, I would use "foolish" as the translation. If he was trying to end on an upbeat note and to, perhaps, invoke his father's sense of humor, he might have used it to mean the equivalent of "stupid."

    I only add this to assist the OP in choosing the word most appropriate to what his son said and how it was said.

    Phil
     

    HalfTaff

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    In the WR dictionary I find:

    Ti raccomando la massima cautela.
    I recommend the utmost caution.

    The title of this thread is "Mi raccomando: giudizio", which is translated as a recommendation for common sense.

    Can someone explain to me why "ti" is used in one instance and "mi" in the other?

    Thanks in advance.


     

    MR1492

    Senior Member
    English -USA
    In the WR dictionary I find:

    Ti raccomando la massima cautela.
    I recommend the utmost caution.

    The title of this thread is "Mi raccomando: giudizio", which is translated as a recommendation for common sense.

    Can someone explain to me why "ti" is used in one instance and "mi" in the other?

    Thanks in advance.



    Could it be that the ones in the WR dictionary are basic statements but mi raccomando is more like "listen to me"? It seems more a directive to someone than a general statement.

    Phil
     

    Pietruzzo

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Can someone explain to me why "ti" is used in one instance and "mi" in the other?
    Those are two different verbs: "raccomandare" and "raccomandarsi".
    The former means "to recommend (something to someone).
    Eg. Ti raccomando di leggere quel post

    The latter has no object and basically means "please remember what I'm telling you / I told you" (The closest literal translation I can think of is - I'm putting in a word for myself-)
    Eg. Mi raccomando, leggi quel post!
    Leggi quel post, mi raccomando!
     
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