might have you <running><run>…

nnyy

Senior Member
Korean
Some fad diets might have you running a caloric deficit.

I think ‘running’ should be ‘run’, because of ‘have’.

Why is running correct in this?
Thanks for your help. :)
 
  • boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    'Running' suggests the condition will continue while you are on the diet in question.

    'Run' would suggest the beginning of the condition or maybe going through the condition and recovering from it, i.e. completion... It would be less clear. :confused:
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    From Michael Swan's Practical English Usage,Third Edition, paragraph 238:
    1 causative: have somebody do/doing something
    Have +
    object + infinitive
    can mean 'cause somebody to do something'
    [...]
    The structure with an -ing can mean 'cause somebody to be doing something' (BrE and AmE)
    He had us laughing all through the meal.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    Some fad diets might have you running a caloric deficit.
    I think ‘running’ should be ‘run’, because of ‘have’.
    Why is running correct in this?
    I think both could work here, thought that might not always be the case.

    ...might have you running a deficit = ...might have you experience a deficit as you continue on the diet.
    ...might have you run a deficit = ...might have you experience a deficit as a consequence of the diet.
     

    AnythingGoes

    Senior Member
    English - USA (Midwest/Appalachia)
    ...might have you running a deficit = ...might have you experience a deficit as you continue on the diet.:tick:
    ...might have you run a deficit = ...might have you experience a deficit as a consequence of the diet.:cross:
    The causative have doesn't work there.
     

    AnythingGoes

    Senior Member
    English - USA (Midwest/Appalachia)
    Interesting, AG: I see have in the OP as causative.

    Perhaps I've misunderstood?
    No, it was my mistake. Of course it's a causative have. I'm not sure how to describe the construction that doesn't work.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    I hadn't even heard the term "causative have" till this thread. :)
    I'm not sure how to describe the construction that doesn't work.
    What's the "construction that doesn't work"? If you're referring to the phrase that you marked a cross against, that was to explain to the OP how I interpret "have you run a deficit". Are you objecting to the grammar or the interpretation?
     

    AnythingGoes

    Senior Member
    English - USA (Midwest/Appalachia)
    What's the "construction that doesn't work"? If you're referring to the phrase that you marked a cross against, that was to explain to the OP how I interpret "have you run a deficit". Are you objecting to the grammar or the interpretation?
    This sentence doesn't work: Some fad diets might have you run a caloric deficit.

    Both it and the original sentence, which uses running, are examples of a causative verb. I don't know how to describe the difference.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    This sentence doesn't work: Some fad diets might have you run a caloric deficit.
    I see. I thought you saw something wrong in my interpretation of the sentence, since that sentence was suggested by the OP, not me.

    Anyway, would you like to explain why?
     
    Last edited:

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    All right. I don't see anything wrong with it, grammatically at least, other than that the use of "run" sounds informal. Perhaps someone else will spot what you're referring to.
     
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