Mine

GakiNoHime

New Member
Philippines - Filipino
Hi everyone,


May I please have the Japanese translation of: Mine

I am planning to use it as an endearment.


Thank you. ^_^
 
  • Strutter

    Senior Member
    Japanese.
    Hello.

    I want more detailed context. Anyway, e.g., if you wanted to say "you are mine", I would suggest "誰にも渡したくない".

    But ... I think there are so many possible translations for "mine", so you had better show context.
     

    GakiNoHime

    New Member
    Philippines - Filipino
    Thank you for all your replies.

    It is going to be like those other endearments such as baby, dear, darling, love, honey.

    Also, I cannot understand those in Japanese characters. I'm sorry.

    Thank you so much.
     

    Wishfull

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    If you are a woman, and your boyfriend's name is John,
    "watashidakeno John e" might be one option.

    私だけのジョンへ
     

    Wishfull

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Hi.

    Hitorijime shitai John e.

    Oops! It becomes longer.

    Watashino John e.
    might be a little shorter.
     

    Flaminius

    coclea mod
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    It is going to be like those other endearments such as baby, dear, darling, love, honey.
    Can you replace the following honey with mine in English?
    Take some honey in your tea, honey.

    In other words, can you call someone mine? I don't think so.

    Is there a shorter version of it?
    At any rate, it's not possible in Japanese. In fact, even the longer versions are very rare in actual Japanese. They do exist in translated literature but it's hard to imagine that real Japanese lovers would call each other by translated endearment terms.
     

    hilfmir

    New Member
    Chinese-Mandarin
    Can you replace the following honey with mine in English?
    Take some honey in your tea, honey.

    In other words, can you call someone mine? I don't think so.


    At any rate, it's not possible in Japanese. In fact, even the longer versions are very rare in actual Japanese. They do exist in translated literature but it's hard to imagine that real Japanese lovers would call each other by translated endearment terms.

    so in what forms would real Japanese lovers call each other?
     

    Flaminius

    coclea mod
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    So in what forms would real Japanese lovers call each other?
    Typically they call each other by their given names combined with endearment suffixes (-chan, -kun etc.). These forms are rarely private codes (expressions used only by the couple, unbeknownst to others); as they are very easy to guess.
     

    hilfmir

    New Member
    Chinese-Mandarin
    omg i just called a common friend by xx kun...
    but my japanese friend also address me as xx chan and boys as xx kun, how does that go?
     

    Flaminius

    coclea mod
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    OMG, I just called a common friend by xx kun...
    but my Japanese friends also address me as xx chan and boys as xx kun. How does that go?
    Please apply standard writing conventions such as capitalisation.

    No harm is done, hilfmir. It simply is that Japanese has no endearment appellations set apart from casual appellations.
     

    hilfmir

    New Member
    Chinese-Mandarin
    Please apply standard writing conventions such as capitalisation.

    No harm is done, hilfmir. It simply is that Japanese has no endearment appellations set apart from casual appellations.
    Thanks a lot, Flaminius!
    But (sorry for too many 'but's, I hate 'but', too.) a friend I know calls her boyfriend by changing his name a little bit into another lovely cartoon character's name. Is that a kind of code between lovers?

    For example, assume her bf's name is 'Kuma'(bear)
    she calls him 'Reraku' kun(short for 'Rerakuma', relax bear;a popular character)
     

    almostfreebird

    Senior Member
    Born and raised in Japón, soy japonés
    Sometimes fresh couples have a way of kissing or caressing, and murmuring funny nicknames like Rerakukun each other until maybe they break up.
     

    hilfmir

    New Member
    Chinese-Mandarin
    Oh I got it.
    That is: it is unnatural using endearment appellations or pronouns like mine(watashi no) or honey or sweetheart between lovers in nomal life.
    But still they share a private code by calling nicknames just like any other lovers do around the world.
    So in a way we can see Reraku kun as 'my dear Winnie bear'
    Right?
     

    almostfreebird

    Senior Member
    Born and raised in Japón, soy japonés
    ""like mine(watashi no)""

    You can use that like "watashi no Reraku kun" if you want to, but it sounds creepy to me.



    ""So in a way we can see Reraku kun as 'my dear Winnie bear'
    Right? ""

    That's right.
     
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