minor but persistent

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Nunty

Senior Member
Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
This is related to a thread I started in the Italian English forum.

I am looking for an adjective that means "not very important, but steady" or "minor but persistent".

This is for the translation of a text about finding the location of a Christian holy place. The text discusses the various places that might be the location and comes down in favor of one that meets several objective criteria and is also identified as that site by a local tradition that was never very well-known outside the area but has been consistent and persistent.

Is there an adjective in English for that?

Thanks!
 
  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Hello Nun-T. My first thought was niggling ~WRONG, EWIE! How about stubborn?
    A stubborn local tradition has it that this is the exact spot where ...
     

    Nunty

    Senior Member
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    Hi ewie. :)

    Thanks, but I need a word with a lovely, positive connotation and I need it to contain both ideas: "not big" and "consistent".
     

    Harry Batt

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Well, this might only be explained with an illustration. "The local tradition is like dermatitis; which becomes active if you scratch it."

    I would call it "an obstinate claim."
     
    Last edited:

    Nunty

    Senior Member
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    I think you're right. Based on the original Italian text, I've come up with this:
    Among these, [place name] has been carried by the little stream of tradition for the past 700 years up to the present day.

    Actually, the Italian says that [place name] "has carried the little stream of tradition..." but that doesn't make sense to me in English. Maybe "has been confirmed by"?
     

    Meeracat

    Senior Member
    I think you're right. Based on the original Italian text, I've come up with this:
    Among these, [place name] has been carried by the little stream of tradition for the past 700 years up to the present day.

    Actually, the Italian says that [place name] "has carried the little stream of tradition..." but that doesn't make sense to me in English. Maybe "has been confirmed by"?
    There is an English phrase: 'small current' as in 'a small current of opinion . . .' I'm not sure it makes for a nice sounding phrase in your context. I am still flying a flag for 'abiding'. 'Small' isn't quite right but in the context but ' Among these . . . has had a small but abiding tradition . . .' is liveable with I would think.
     
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