MIR-ee-ud for 'myriad'/ PLEH-thuh-ruh for 'plethora' [name of American English respelling system?]

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eclectic

Member
WU-CHINESE
First of all, I'm not sure if this is the right place to post the question, if not, please inform me.

I bought a couple of SAT books from the United States 4 or 5 years ago, just curious about the test and wanted to find some useful information for students in China. Vocabulary books offer a respelling style, for instances, authors spell word "myriad", "plethora" as "MIR-ee-ud", "PLEH-thuh-ruh" etc..Such a respelling looks like ARPAbet or BBC pronunciation, I have also noticed that it is very like NBC respelling style which used to appear in different newspapers.

So What is the respelling's formal name and Who had invented that system or a phonetic notation? Somebody can talk about its history? Thanks.
 
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  • natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    You might want to have a look at this Wikipedia article:

    Pronunciation respelling for English

    There are two basic types of pronunciation respelling. "Phonemic" systems, as commonly found in American dictionaries, consistently use one symbol per English phoneme. These systems are conceptually equivalent to the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) commonly used in bilingual dictionaries and scholarly writings, but tend to use symbols based on English rather than Romance-language spelling conventions (e.g. ē for IPA /i/) and avoid non-alphabetic symbols (e.g. sh for IPA /ʃ/). On the other hand, "non-phonemic" or "newspaper" systems, commonly used in newspapers and other non-technical writings, avoid diacritics and literally "respell" words making use of well-known English words and spelling conventions, even though the resulting system may not have a one-to-one mapping between symbols and sounds.
    You're referring to a phonemic system of respelling. There isn't a single respelling system, and different dictionaries might have slightly different systems. Up until the 1980s, British (non-learner's) dictionaries also used phonemic respelling. It was used in Samuel Johnson's Dictionary of 1755, and some might argue that the dictionary respelling systems are inspired by his system.
     
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    eclectic

    Member
    WU-CHINESE
    You might want to have a look at this Wikipedia article:

    Pronunciation respelling for English


    You're referring to a phonemic system of respelling. There isn't a single respelling system, and different dictionaries might have slightly different systems. Up until the 1980s, British (non-learner's) dictionaries also used phonemic respelling. It was used in Samuel Johnson's Dictionary of 1755, and some might argue that the dictionary respelling systems are inspired by his system.
    So nobody "owns" the respelling system?
     

    eclectic

    Member
    WU-CHINESE
    "Respelling" was never mentioned in my schooling, and I never heard of it before now. We were taught only correct spelling.
    I SEE, but people even native speakers will need some phonetic notations when they are confused by some pronunciations. You know, linguists prefer IPA which is complex and not widely-accepted by common students.
     

    eclectic

    Member
    WU-CHINESE
    No doubt, dictionaries 'borrowed' from each other, but as the article indicates different dictionaries have different systems of respelling.
    I just wanted to introduce a more general respelling system to more non-native speakers. What a pity we don't have any formal name for that "general" American-English respelling system.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    The categories given by Wikipedia seem like good labels: phonemic respelling and newspaper respelling​. Only there are competing phonemic respelling systems.
     
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