Miracle chasing = mirage chasing?

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goldencypress

Senior Member
India - Malayalam
The days of the miracles are dead and gone. Miracles don’t happen anymore. So when you are chasing a miracle, aren’t you chasing a mirage?

(I do know an exceptional product or achievement is often termed as a miracle. E.g.: A miracle drug, a miraculous escape)

The theme chosen for an International Organization (in which I am a member) is “Miracle Chasers”. I think it means they are trying to achieve the impossible and, therefore, is quite odd. Do you agree?
 
  • Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    I don't think we can determine whether your organization's "theme" is appropriate or not without knowing more about the organization and what it does. But '"Mirage Chasers" strikes me as a rather self-defeating description for a group to give itself.

    Are you asking a language question here? If so, please clarify it.
     

    goldencypress

    Senior Member
    India - Malayalam
    I don't think we can determine whether your organization's "theme" is appropriate or not without knowing more about the organization and what it does. But '"Mirage Chasers" strikes me as a rather self-defeating description for a group to give itself.

    Are you asking a language question here? If so, please clarify it.
    Yes, I am asking a language question because I think Miracle Chasing is wrongly used . The organization is Rotary International Home | Rotary International
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    You appear to have a clear understanding of what is meant by the word "miracles," and how the word is used, but to disagree with the Rotarians about whether miracles can happen.

    You admitted in your original post that exceptional products or achievements are sometimes referred to as "miracles," so I think you have answered your own question.
     

    goldencypress

    Senior Member
    India - Malayalam
    You appear to have a clear understanding of what is meant by the word "miracles," and how the word is used, but to disagree with the Rotarians about whether miracles can happen.

    You admitted in your original post that exceptional products or achievements are sometimes referred to as "miracles," so I think you have answered your own question.
    You are, for instance, trying to find a cure for your baldness. I know that there is no known cure for it. Therefore, I might tell you that you are chasing a miracle meaning that you are trying to achieve something that is impossible to achieve.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Then it becomes an "everyday" affair, doesn't it? You don't chase" things that happen every day, do you?:rolleyes:
    Not every miracle happens every day, but with billions of people in the world many small miracles happen and occasionally a large miracle happens. The point is: a mirage is absolutely an unreal thing, but many people would say that miracles have happened to them. Your definition of "miracle" doesn't really fit the way the Rotarians mean it.
     

    goldencypress

    Senior Member
    India - Malayalam
    Not every miracle happens every day, but with billions of people in the world many small miracles happen and occasionally a large miracle happens. The point is: a mirage is absolutely an unreal thing, but many people would say that miracles have happened to them. Your definition of "miracle" doesn't really fit the way the Rotarians mean it.
    Something unusual or extraordinary cannot be called a miracle. Even the near possiblity of eliminating polio cannot be called a miracle because of years of dedication and hard work made that a near possiblity.

    Miracles are something that happens in a jiffy without much effort.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    I'm confused by this thread, and I'm not sure what exactly you're trying to ask.
    The theme chosen ...is “Miracle Chasers”. I think it means they are trying to achieve the impossible and, therefore, is quite odd. Do you agree?
    No. Just because something might be, to you, impossible, it doesn't mean others can't chase it.
     

    goldencypress

    Senior Member
    India - Malayalam
    I'm confused by this thread, and I'm not sure what exactly you're trying to ask.

    No. Just because something might be, to you, impossible, it doesn't mean others can't chase it.
    If I tell you that you are chasing a miracle I would mean that you are trying to do the impossible and, therefore, you are engaged in a futile pursuit.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Something unusual or extraordinary cannot be called a miracle.
    Other people can call things miracles if they want to, and, in fact, they do. You are not going to convince them that they are wrong, so you may as well relax and accept the slogan. :)
    You don't get to tell other people what words mean.
     

    goldencypress

    Senior Member
    India - Malayalam
    Perhaps, but how does the futility of the pursuit of miracles change the fact that I am chasing miracles and am, therefore, a miracle chaser?
    You CAN chase a miracle, but an organisation like Rotary cannot make that a slogan.

    Would you vote for a political party that offers to chase miracles meaning unrealistic objectives?
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    The discussion has strayed far from any question about the meaning of the word "miracles." Thank you to all who participated. This thread is closed.

    Florentia52, moderator
     
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