Miss Abbot, also in her best

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kitesandeater

Senior Member
Spanish
de Where Angels Fear to Tread, by E.M. Foster, Published in England (1905)

Buenas tardes. ¿also in her best es una expresión concreta? Si no lo fuese ¿Está aceptablemente traducido (castellano, en negrita)
Muchas gracias.

Dinner was a nightmare. They had the smelly dining-room to themselves. Lilia, very smart and vociferous, was at the head of the table; Miss Abbot, also in her best, sat by Philip, looking, to his irritated nerves, more like the tragedy confidant every moment. That scion of the Italian nobility, Signor Carella, sat opposite. Behind him loomed a bowl of goldfish, who swam round and round, gaping at the guests.

El almuerzo fue una pesadilla. Tenían para ellos solos el maloliente comedor. Lilia, muy hábil y vehemente, presidía la mesa; Miss Abbot, también en su mejor papel, sentada junto a Philip, observando, a sus irritados nervios, más como el confidente en la tragedia en todo momento. Ese descendiente de la nobleza italiana, el Signor Carella, se sentó frente a ellos. Detrás de él sobresalía una pecera redonda con peces de colores, que nadaban en círculos, mirando boquiabiertos a los invitados.
 
  • User With No Name

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    Best clothing, I think.

    If you look a few lines above, there is a mention of someone wearing her best blouse.
     
    Last edited:

    Isabel Sewell

    Banned
    Spanish
    de Where Angels Fear to Tread, by E.M. Foster, Published in England (1905)

    Buenas tardes. ¿also in her best es una expresión concreta? Si no lo fuese ¿Está aceptablemente traducido (castellano, en negrita)
    Muchas gracias.

    Dinner was a nightmare. They had the smelly dining-room to themselves. Lilia, very smart and vociferous, was at the head of the table; Miss Abbot, also in her best, sat by Philip, looking, to his irritated nerves, more like the tragedy confidant every moment. That scion of the Italian nobility, Signor Carella, sat opposite. Behind him loomed a bowl of goldfish, who swam round and round, gaping at the guests.

    El almuerzo fue una pesadilla. Tenían para ellos solos el maloliente comedor. Lilia, muy hábil y vehemente, presidía la mesa; Miss Abbot, también en su mejor papel, sentada junto a Philip, observando, a sus irritados nervios, más como el confidente en la tragedia en todo momento. Ese descendiente de la nobleza italiana, el Signor Carella, se sentó frente a ellos. Detrás de él sobresalía una pecera redonda con peces de colores, que nadaban en círculos, mirando boquiabiertos a los invitados.

    Miss Abbot, también en su mejor papel:tick:

    Dinner (evening meal) : la cena

    Lilia was vociferous: "a speaker, performer" (behavior, character)
    Miss Abbot, also in her best...looking...like...a confidant: "a listener, performer" (also behavior, character)
     

    Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Miss Abbot, también en su mejor papel

    Dinner (evening meal) : la cena

    Lilia was vociferous: "a speaker, performer" (behavior, character)
    Miss Abbot, also in her best...looking...like...a confidant: "a listener, performer" (also behavior, character)
    No That is incorrect. I agree with the other native English speakers, User With No Name and OtroLencho


    "in her best" can only refer to her clothing.

    Behaviour would be indicated differently, e.g.

    She was at her best (she was showing the best aspect of herself)

    She was on her best behaviour.
     

    Isabel Sewell

    Banned
    Spanish
    No That is incorrect. I agree with the other native English speakers, User With No Name and OtroLencho


    "in her best" can only refer to her clothing.

    Behaviour would be indicated differently, e.g.
    In her best (role, performance) = papel

    You are attempting to (but can not) change the words that were written/published in a book in 1905. The original word is in not at or on
     

    Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    In her best (role, performance) = papel :cross:
    Sorry but that is simply incorrect. I don't know why you are insisting on it.

    I see that Bevj has now confirmed what all the other native speakers have said.

    NOTE

    E.M. Forster was an English novelist. He would have used 'smart' to mean smartly dressed. Only Americans used 'smart' to mean clever at that time. Even now very few British people use smart to mean clever.

    Lilia, very smartly dressed and vociferous, was at the head of the table; Miss Abbot, also in her best attire...
     
    Last edited:
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