miss/mister/master

lady jekyll

Senior Member
Spanish
Hallo everyone!

How do you say in polish Miss Smith when you refer to a woman who isn't married? And if she is married? And what about with a man?

Thank you in advanced.

Greetings
LJ
 
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  • przemo84

    Senior Member
    Panna Smith - unmarried woman
    Pani Smith - married or unmarried woman
    Pan - married or unmarried man

    But if you refer to a woman you'd better say "Pani" because you might not know whether she's married.
     

    lady jekyll

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Thank you, przemo84.
    Can you say like in English: "Good morning, Panna, how are you"?
    I mean without mentioning the surname. Just only using "Panna" like: Hello, Miss,...

    Thank you again.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Thank you, przemo84.
    Can you say like in English: "Good morning, Panna, how are you"?
    I mean without mentioning the surname. Just only using "Panna" like: Hello, Miss,...

    Thank you again.
    Helo Lady, :)

    I think it would be more natural to say Panienka:
    Dzień dobry (Panience/Panienko), jak się Panienka miewa?
    but it sounds like you've just tanken it out from a nineteenth-century novel. We don't really use Panienka or Panna for in Modern Polish.

    Normally you would use Pani instead Panienka.
    Tom: Dzień dobry (Pani), jak się Pani miewa? (Hello, Miss/Mrs, how are you?)
    Lady: Dzień dobry Panu, dziękuję, w porządku, a Pan? (Hello, Mister (I don't think it would be used in English, but it's for the sake of explication), thank you, everything is all right, and you (Mister)?

    Needless to say, they are formal in register.
     
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    kknd

    Senior Member
    polski / Polish
    I think that Panienko is not valued as much as it should in contemporary language. Even if I use such phrases to humorous, informal effect I think they could gain some popularity nowadays. Those expressions are such nice.

    I belive you can try using panna title to young lady (girl): it would be perfectly fine when she's below 16-18 in my opinion (it will add some playfulness to conversation), when she's above 18, let's say to 24, you can try to guess if she's still a miss (you should notice that in Polish word for 'miss' coincides with 'virgin', so this is source of reserve many has for using this word), it can give some flirtatious character to your talk! ;) If your guess was a miss you'll be let known about it, and rather in nice and kind atmosphere. Worth trying in my opinion! :p

    All in all I think it depend of you if you want to use rather informal (or strictly formal) in register relations with somebody. Informal in sense of playfulness, because people tend to use their names when they know themselves for some time.

    You can recall parent jocularly scolding his/her daughter: 'Listen, Miss...!' :) For your information: Panienko is diminutive of Panno, both being vocatives of Panienka and Panna respectively. Second (not diminutive) is seemed as little too official/formal, as in example above (with parent). Last thing: such expression are rather suitable for playful characters/intelligent tricksters. If don't feel like any or you'd like to be perceived as good/bad/smart guy I don't think such vocabulary will go along with those. :D
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Kknd, I don't quite understand some of your comments.
    [...]
    I belive you can try using panna title to young lady (girl): it would be perfectly fine when she's below 16-18 in my opinion (it will add some playfulness to conversation), when she's above 18, let's say to 24, you can try to guess if she's still a miss [...], it can give some flirtatious character to your talk! ;) If your guess was a miss you'll be let known about it, and rather in nice and kind atmosphere. Worth trying in my opinion! :p
    I would say so about panienka, but not about panna.
    Dzień dobry Panno, jak się Panna miewa?
    doesn't sound good nor natural, to me.:confused: Unless this is a sort of idiolect.
    (you should notice that in Polish word for 'miss' coincides with 'virgin', so this is source of reserve many has for using this word)
    You will have to elaborate on this one, please.
    Polish word "panna" doesn't mean "virgin", unless you're talking about zodiac signs. That said, I doubt whether someone would be reluctant to use it because it also means a zodiac sign.
     

    lady jekyll

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Hallo together!

    Well, I'm looking for the expression that refers to a woman who is about 23-28 years old and is married. The man that speaks to her is a servant. How has he to refer to her?

    Thanks again.
    LJ
     

    Greg from Poland

    Senior Member
    Polish
    lady jekyll,

    I find it highly unnatural to call a woman "panna" or, what is worse, "panienka". In my opinion, these words could be used if you were significantly older than the person you intend to talk to; nevertheless, it would still sound a bit humorous or old-fashioned to me. "Pani" is certainly the safest option.

    As far as the second part is concerned, "miewać się" doesn't sound that bad. I would use, though, "co słychać?" in every-day language.

    To sum up, I think it would be best to ask "Dzień dobry (Pani), co słychać?".
     

    lady jekyll

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Thanks, Greg.
    I have forgotten to say that the scene occurs during the 1930's. And the servant is about ten years older then the woman.
    Pani would be right, I am right?
     
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