mistake the deadline?

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anandah

Member
Korean
Hello everyone.
I want to express this idea
1) The deadline for submission was actually Dec 25
2) But I wrongly thought it would be Dec 26.
3) Consequently, I've missed the deadline
4) I'm explaining the situation to my teacher, Mr. Blackmore.

My question is , in this case, which is more appropriate or do you have some better suggestion?
"Mr. Blackmore,
I'm afraid I
A: had a wrong idea about the deadline
B: mistook the dealine
C: was misinformed over the deadline.
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    All three of your answers mean different things -- you need to decide why you thought it was the 26th: because someone misinformed you, because you heard the date wrong, because you're forgetful, because you just guessed, because you forgot? Then write your sample sentence and we can help you.
     

    anandah

    Member
    Korean
    All three of your answers mean different things -- you need to decide why you thought it was the 26th: because someone misinformed you, because you heard the date wrong, because you're forgetful, because you just guessed, because you forgot? Then write your sample sentence and we can help you.

    Always thank you, Copyright.

    I even don't know clearly why I have had the wrong information.
    It seems to be quite a difficult psychologic subject.
    But I think I, perhaps, heard the date wrongly, in other words, misconceived it,for example, because of my poor English skill.

    In addition, could you please explain the diffences amongst three sentences I took apiece?
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I might say this: Mr. Blackmore, I'm sorry to have misunderstood the deadline. I thought it was a day later.

    A: had a wrong idea about the deadline -- we wouldn't say this; maybe "didn't understand the deadline."
    B: mistook the deadline -- we wouldn't say this; maybe "misunderstood the deadline."
    C: was misinformed over the deadline -- "someone told me the wrong date."
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I probably would have said something like this:

    I would have gotten it in by the deadline but I thought the due date was on the 26th and not the 25th.

    Note: "Gotten it in" is a bit more colloquial than "submitted" and if you want a more formal reply, then use "submitted".
     

    anandah

    Member
    Korean
    I probably would have said something like this:

    I would have gotten it in by the deadline but I thought the due date was on the 26th and not the 25th.

    Note: "Gotten it in" is a bit more colloquial than "submitted" and if you want a more formal reply, then use "submitted".
    Thank you , Packard.

    Many non-natives, of course including me, probably feel difficulty in using colloquial expressions, in particular, phrasal verbs: as you can imagine, all about go, come, get, take, set, put and that kind of thing.

    I believe the huge stock of colloquial expressions is one of the most terrible aspects of English by contrast to other languages, and even its close cousins belonging to German Language family. Yet, I also agree those help English get rich and fun.

    Next time I'd try to use "get it in" rather than "submit" and might recall kind Packard.

    Thank you again.
     

    anandah

    Member
    Korean
    I might say this: Mr. Blackmore, I'm sorry to have misunderstood the deadline. I thought it was a day later.

    A: had a wrong idea about the deadline -- we wouldn't say this; maybe "didn't understand the deadline."
    B: mistook the deadline -- we wouldn't say this; maybe "misunderstood the deadline."
    C: was misinformed over the deadline -- "someone told me the wrong date."

    Thank you Copyright, again.
    I believe your instructions always deserve copyright.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    "I didn't realise the deadline was the twenty-fifth."

    "Realise" can be a useful verb in these situations.

    ....huge stock of colloquial expressions is one of the most terrible aspects of English ...
    It must be an absolute nightmare. Dealing with the common unavoidable ones must be difficult enough, but there are many you only need to understand.
    Using the right word in the right place is important too. It's a good general rule to use the word everybody else is using, written and spoken. And then there are the differences in usage between native speakers most obviously between American and British based varieties

    There are at least four options here. I agree that "to get the work in" is the least formal, but the use of "gotten" is American.

    to submit
    to hand in
    to give in
    to get in

    :)
    Hermione
     
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