*****misunderstanding*****

kari

Member
Italian - Italy
Hi people!
if you are going to take a party with a lot of italian dishes such as cheese, spaghetti, cotoletta alla milanese.....and if you ask to someone "to cut the cheese" to help you....do you think that is a rude way to say or not?
 
  • VenusEnvy

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    kari said:
    Hi people!
    if you are going to take a party with a lot of italian dishes such as cheese, spaghetti, cotoletta alla milanese.....and if you ask to someone "to cut the cheese" to help you....do you think that is a rude way to say or not?
    Um, no, it's not rude. However, the phrase "to cut the cheese" has another comical meaning in English. You may receive a few giggles. :p

    Does someone else want to elaborate? :eek:
     

    B. Davis

    Member
    US English
    Hi Kari,

    Yes, in colloquial English, "cut the cheese" means to produce a sound with the anus as a result of excessive pressure build-up (flatulance). I would not ask someone to "cut the cheese" in the dining room, but it would be appropriate in the kitchen. In the dining room, I would ask them to "slice the cheese", and be spared the giggles.

    Bruce
     

    Sharon

    Senior Member
    United States, English
    Kari,

    Yes, I agree with Bruce and Venus Envy. It is not a rude comment, but you might want to use the word "slice" just to avoid the startled expressions, raised eyebrows, and giggles!

    Sharon.:)
     

    kari

    Member
    Italian - Italy
    Thanks a lot guys!
    Now I know it! I don't have to use "to cut" but "to slice" in this case. Oh my goodness, it is so embaressing!
    But is it possible to say "to cut the cheese" in the general meaning? I.E. "don't say nonsense!"?
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    kari said:
    Thanks a lot guys!
    Now I know it! I don't have to use "to cut" but "to slice" in this case. Oh my goodness, it is so embaressing!
    But is it possible to say "to cut the cheese" in the general meaning? I.E. "don't say nonsense!"?
    Sure it's possible. If you have lots of teenagers in the kitchen, they will probably laugh, and have a good time making fun of you. If you are working with adults in the kitchen, they will probably ask you for a cutting board and a good cheese knife, and not think anything further about it.

    Cuchuféte

    PD- Perhaps I've misunderstood you....Cut the cheese, in AE, does NOT mean "Don't say nonsense!" We do have a couple of expressions for that, such as "Cut it out." which simply means "Stop it!" A ruder expression that may mean "Don't say nonsense!" is "Cut the crap." C.
     

    Oros

    Senior Member
    Korean
    If it is vulgar, I suspect it is confined either BrE or AmE.
    Would you expect it to be vulgar for all those who speaks English?
     

    kari

    Member
    Italian - Italy
    In Italy (in Rome) we could say "don't gun (or shoot) craps"! Similar to "cut the crap".
    Anyway I 'm asking to myself the reason of that saw, do you (anglo people) think maybe the cheese is fouled? 'Cause it could be, but not in that way, I hope, I love cheese, especially to aim there is "gorgonzola"! :)
    Bye
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    kari said:
    In Italy (in Rome) we could say "don't gun (or shoot) craps"! Similar to "cut the crap".
    Anyway I 'm asking to myself the reason of that saw, do you (anglo people) think maybe the cheese is fouled? 'Cause it could be, but not in that way, I hope, I love cheese, especially to aim there is "gorgonzola"! :)
    Bye
    Kari,

    Il formaggio é buono. Let the people cut it, eat it, and relax.

    C
     
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