Mixture of grated onion and minced meat

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  • suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    It’s a kebab when it’s cooked.
    When it’s raw I’m not sure what to call it.
    Kebab mix?
    I probably wouldn’t use “dough” because that’s associated with flour based pastes.
     

    supermarioutd

    Senior Member
    Persian
    It’s a kebab when it’s cooked.
    When it’s raw I’m not sure what to call it.
    Kebab mix?
    I probably wouldn’t use “dough” because that’s associated with flour baesd pastes.
    Exactly. It's not cooked yet. I know in English dough does not work
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    We call minced met with spices "hamburger meat" in the US.

    Usually it is shaped into flat "patties", and cooked on a grill over a fire (or fried in a pan) to make the cooked dish "hamburgers". These may be eaten with a fork, or put between slices of bread.

    Sometimes a larger amount is baked in a rectangular pan: it is the size of a loaf of bread. This dish is called "meat loaf". It is always eaten on a plate with a fork.

    A kebab (or shish kebab) is several things on a skewer. The things may be minced meat balls like this, or whole chunks of meat, or vegetables, or a combination.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Yes, it does. It's called 'hamburger' or ground meat or 'mince', when it's in very small pieces. It might also be called sausage meat or forcemeat. It can sometimes be so finely ground that it is rather paste-like.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Forcemeat (derived from the French farcir, "to stuff") is a mixture of ground, lean meat mixed with fat by grinding, sieving, or puréeing the ingredients. The result may either be smooth or coarse, depending on the desired consistency of the final product.
    [Wiki]
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Yes. Apparently uncooked meat does not have a word in English.
    There are words for "uncooked meat". Thesaurus.com lists "ground round, ground sirloin, ground chuck, salisbury steak, hamburger, chopped steak" as common terms. We also add "ground" or "minced" to the kind of animal meat: "ground beef, ground pork, ground lamb, ground buffalo meat" etc.

    When we do cooking from a different country, we typically use words from that country. Unless it is something very common in US cooking, a separate English word does not develop. Even "shish kebab" was originally Armenian.

    I checked on-line for a Persian restaurant menu (in English) and found this entry:
    - Koobideh - 2 skewers of flavoured minced lamb grilled over open fire

    So I am guessing "flavoured minced lamb" is the English expression for what you picture in post #1. As you say, English has no specific word for it.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Apparently uncooked meat does not have a word in English.
    We call it raw meat. But that’s just a general term.
    Forcemeat (more or less the same as sausage meat) is a fine mixture used for stuffing. Apparently it’s also called salpicon (a mixture of finely chopped ingredients bound in a thick sauce and used as a filling or stuffing), but that’s a new one on me.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    This picture might help you:

    http://blog.shemroonkabab.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/Kabab-Koobide-1170x780.jpg

    I am not talking about meat for burger. This is a mixture for Persian kebab.
    There is no real difference in the actual STUFF, though! Lots of cultures have this tradition of blending minced meat with a few other things like onion, egg, bread crumbs, herbs and spices to make a tasty savoury meal. Sausages, burger, meatballs, meat loaf, kebabs, all a riff on the same thing. It seems we don't have a single specific word for that type of mix. You just choose the adjective that best suits your context. In your case "kebab .... " I have already suggested mix or paste. I personally don't think "meat" is a good enough term because it doesn't distinguish between the raw ingredient of simple minced lamb and the mix you have after you've added the other stuff to it.
     
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