mock-designer

Cymralle

Member
French-France
Hello everyone !

I'm trying to find the French equivalent for "mock-designer" (when you talk about clothes : "mock-designer jeans" "mock-designer tee-shirts" etc), and I think that I need your help.

I'm not totally sure of the meaning, I thought of something like clothes pretended to be like real designer's ones but are not, something cheaper than a real designed cloth would be... But even like this, I still can't find an appropriate equivalent in French : "des tee-shirt qui imitent ceux des créateurs" ? "des vêtements bas de gamme qui copient ceux des créateurs ?"

I don't know... what do you think ?
 
  • philosophia

    Senior Member
    français (France)
    A propos des marques, on parle souvent de faux quelque chose : faux Lacoste, faux Vuitton, fausse Rollex...
    Donc pourquoi pas des faux vêtements (jeans, t-shirts etc...) de marque ?
     

    Uncle Bob

    Senior Member
    British English
    I'm troubled by the hyphen. Is "mock-designer" the same as "mock designer", which can be translated as per philosophia, or does it rather refer to ridiculising designer clothes?
     
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    Cymralle

    Member
    French-France
    At first I thought of an idea of "mocking" designers (the first meaning of "mock" that came to me) but... I couldn't see actually what kind of clothes would be made to "ridiculise" designers and it didn't make sense to me in that context.

    The text is about someone in a town, going to a clothes shop, the exact sentence is : "[the shop] has racks of tie-dyed skirts outside, with mock-designer tee-shirts crowding the doorway"
    [...]
    This extract comes from a text written in UK-english and inside the book, there is a lot of expressions written with a ' - ' between two words that I usually find written without it on the web, or as a single word.

    I hope this will help !
     
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    Cymralle

    Member
    French-France
    Thank you all for your answers :)

    I also thought of "fausse marque" as you did Philosophia. But I have the feeling (maybe wrong) that there is a difference between "faux" and "imitations".
    It may not be clear, but to me "faux" would be more something that pretends to be something else. It's a counterfeiter's work. You think it's a Vuitton, a Rollex, there is no big difference visible because there shouldn't be any difference. Although the quality, little details and the price help you see it's a "faux".

    On the other hand, imitations are not supposed to "trick" the customer. Imitations take responsibility for getting inspired by real designers and for "copying" them. They don't pretend to be real Vuitton or real Chanel etc. Zara for exemple is a real brand but is known for getting inspiration from famous designers, although they don't say it directly.
    Some less known brands do the same, sometimes in a corsier way. They put some slight differences, on purpose, to say "Hey this is not a real one ! See ? We used a lezard instead of a crocodile ! But yeah, well... ok, the whole thing is totally inspired from the original one..."
    They try to use colors, shapes etc. that are fashionable, but remain imitations claimed to be ones.

    I know my English is... er... a bit messy but I hope you see what I mean ;) I assume that these clothes, in that shop, are not pretending to be real designers' ones but only get inspired from them... but I'm not sure.
     

    Uncle Bob

    Senior Member
    British English
    Your English is very clear and I understand what you mean. However things that are called "faux" in French are often not designed to trick the customer. Someone (who?) who desperately wants a Cartier watch but cannot afford one can knowingly buy an imitation which is sold as an imitation - and then have the customs/police confiscate it/take him to court because it is a "faux".
     

    Cymralle

    Member
    French-France
    Yes I see ;)
    The limit between "faux" and "imitation" isn't always clear... it may be easier to see the one between legal and illegal. The "Cartier" imitation isn't legal if it totally copies the original but can be legal if some details are changed.

    I should definitely go to that clothes-shop to see if the tee-shirts are imitations like "faux", or imitations that just get inspired but not copy everything :D !
     

    philosophia

    Senior Member
    français (France)
    My answer comes a bit late, but fortunately Uncle Bob explained better than I would have everything I meant.
    Nevertheless, you're right Cymralle some imitations try to trick people and some don't. If you take the Vuitton bags for instance, there are 2 main kinds of "faux-Vuitton" : those that reproduce the logo (roughly) and that might seem to be real Vuittons (if you don't look too close) and those that copy the style but not the logo. In the first case, I'd say they're "contrefaçons" and in the second case "faux". I don't think you could find "contrefaçons" in a shop, because as Uncle Bob pointed out, they're illegal (they're usually sold by people in the street). I'd go for "faux vêtements de marque", but I grant you it's ambiguous.
     
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