Modern language closest to Latin in terms of vocabulary

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  • Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    JLanguage said:
    That's what I was thinking, but would like to hear from people who have studied multiple Romance languages and Latin.
    I can speak for French: Just a few words are the same, and most French words are similar. The declensions are totally different from each other, except for "est" = il est and "es" = tu es.
     

    mirandolina

    Senior Member
    Scotland - English
    What about Sardinian.....
    My professor at University in Scotland was very fond of Sardinia and offered a special option course on Sardinian language. He assured us he had heard one Sardinian say to another "Mea columba est in domus tua" which is almost pure Latin ("My dove is in your house") and "Ponemi tres panes in bertulla" which meant put three loaves in my saddle bag (bertulla is a kind of saddle bag used on a mule or donkey).
     

    ILT

    Senior Member
    México - Español/Castellano
    Once my cousin (who is a priest) and I were talking about Latin, as I was wondering if he agreed that Latin was one of the most difficult languages to learn. During our conversation, he mentioned that when priests are sent to small towns where no Italian is spoken or if the priest does not speak Italian, the priest would speak Latin and that way be able to communicate with the townspeople.

    Given this, I would say Italian is the language that shares the most words with Latin, but would really like to hear the opinion of an Italian native.

    ILT
     

    mirandolina

    Senior Member
    Scotland - English
    I don't know what kind of small town in Italy it could be where "no Italian is spoken", apart from the German-speaking areas in the north, but even there Italian is fairly well understood. The chances of a non Italian-speaking native of Sudtirol understanding Latin are pretty remote!
    Even though certain parts of Italy have a strong local dialect (for example Naples, parts of the South and Sicily) that is impenetrable to Northern ears, they all understand standard Italian, thanks to radio and television... !!!

    However, there are certainly a lot of words in Italian where you can easily identify the Latin root, so maybe it is the language closest to the original.
    I've lived in Italy for over 30 years, but I'm not a native. Maybe I can invite some members of the Italan forum to join in....


    I love translating said:
    Once my cousin (who is a priest) and I were talking about Latin, as I was wondering if he agreed that Latin was one of the most difficult languages to learn. During our conversation, he mentioned that when priests are sent to small towns where no Italian is spoken or if the priest does not speak Italian, the priest would speak Latin and that way be able to communicate with the townspeople.

    Given this, I would say Italian is the language that shares the most words with Latin, but would really like to hear the opinion of an Italian native.

    ILT
     

    walnut

    Senior Member
    Italy - Italian
    I love translating said:
    [...]he mentioned that when priests are sent to small towns where no Italian is spoken or if the priest does not speak Italian, the priest would speak Latin and that way be able to communicate with the townspeople.
    Small town where no italian was spoken were still a majority before WWI, because Italy was a poor, rural country... but then things changed. A few exceptions still survive - as Mirandolina said -: German or French speaking areas, some villages like Kalispera in Puglia where a sort of ancient Greek is spoken, others where albanian is, etc.

    A person who doesn't speak any italian, but can speak latin would be at "survival level" in Italy, I think. Speaking could be quite easy particularly with scholarized persons - but a spanish speaking person would be more easily understood.
    A friend of mine, which is Hungarian native and speaks lots of languages, brilliantly integrates his italian with latin when needed. The result is always fascinating, but I have no idea about the possible result in case of a non-latinized audience.

    Did it help or confused ideas? :) Ciao, Walnut
     

    Silvia

    Senior Member
    Italian
    I agree with Mirandolina and walnut.

    I am a native Italian speaker quite familiar with other Romance languages.

    The original question is: "Modern language closest to Latin in terms of vocabulary?"
    No doubt it is Italian :)

    If your question had been Closest grammar or else, then I would have probably considered Romanian, which still uses declensions, unlike French, Spanish, Portuguese and Italian.

    Special thanks to:
    mirandolina for the invitation :)
    whodunit for the article by Giuseppe DeSicilia, who explained everything very well! Thinking of it... I could have written that article almost verbatim! :D
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    cuchuflete said:
    For vocabulary, I would agree with those who propose Italian. In terms of grammar, my vote goes to Portuguese.
    Just thinking of the easiest phrases. Everyone understands them and these are the first ones I learned in Latin:

    Britannia insula est.
    (noun) (object) (verb)

    Great Britan is an island.

    ----------------------------

    Errare humanum est.
    (noun) (object) (verb)

    To err is human.

    ----------------------------

    Is there any language out there that uses exactly the same structure? :)
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    In my opinion, the original question wrongly assumes that there is a unique language closer to Latin in vocabulary than all others. I doubt that is true. All Romance languages share a great deal of Latin derived vocabulary among themselves. I bet it's more or less the same amount of words, except possibly in the case of Romanian, which acquired a lot of Slavic words.
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    Whodunit said:
    Just thinking of the easiest phrases. Everyone understands them and these are the first ones I learned in Latin:

    Britannia insula est.
    (noun) (object) (verb)

    Great Britan is an island.

    ----------------------------

    Errare humanum est.
    (noun) (object) (verb)

    To err is human.

    ----------------------------

    Is there any language out there that uses exactly the same structure? :)
    As far as I know, all modern Romance languages use SVO syntax instead of classical Latin's SOV, so the answer is probably no.
     

    LaSmarjeZ

    Member
    Sardinia - Italy
    It's the sardinians spoken in the central part of the island (lugudorese-nugorese) for grammar and vocabulary. The dialects spoked in the coast west and south (campidanesu) has been influenceed by spanish, catalan and italian, and the dialects in the north are italian dialects (gaddurese, sassarese)

    I've always heard that the placement og the words in latin is not really important, I mean that you can say "Britannia est insula" or "Britannia insula est" and it's not a mistake
     

    victoria luz

    Senior Member
    Italian
    mirandolina said:
    Even though certain parts of Italy have a strong local dialect (for example Naples, parts of the South and Sicily) that is impenetrable to Northern ears, they all understand standard Italian, thanks to radio and television... !!!

    Mirandolina, speaking a more or less impenetrable dialect doesn't mean by any means being unable to understand (sic) and speak standard Italian, radio and TV having little to do with it, at least in the last 50 years or so!
    You know, there's school too...and strangely enough, teaching and textbooks have been in Italian since several decades now! :rolleyes:
    Actually, under a linguistic perspective, speaking a dialect which is as far as it could from the standard language, helps to deactivate interferences (leakage of dialectal vocabulary/patterns into the standard language).

    walnut said:
    Small town where no italian was spoken were still a majority before WWI, because Italy was a poor, rural country... but then things changed. A few exceptions still survive - as Mirandolina said -: German or French speaking areas, some villages like Kalispera in Puglia where a sort of ancient Greek is spoken, others where albanian is, etc.
    Ciao, Walnut
    Vic --> still laughing at the idea of Calimera (village of southern Apulia) as an enclave where no Italian is spoken :eek: . Or the villages of Albanian origin in Calabria.

    Walnut, which century are you talking about?

    The griko (that sort of ancient greek spoken in Grecìa Salentina - province of Lecce) and the Albanian spoken in areas of the province of Cosenza are just used as DIALECT, and need a tough preservation work to avoid their total disappearance (which would be a huge loss for linguistic diversity) since they are hardly spoken even as such by young generations.

    At times, when I read some posts, I can't help wondering what sort of idea will non native speakers possibly get from some information they can gather here.
     

    Cnaeius

    Senior Member
    Italian, Italy
    In my opinion, in order to evaluate a global closeness to Latin, a lot of considerations have to be done. The main ones:
    • Phonetic considerations
    • Vocabulary (the topic actually is on this)
    • Morphology
    • Syntax
    Considering all these and giving a general, mean answer, I would say that the closest is Italian. But, obviously, this does not mean that the other Romance languages are far. They are however very close. I would say that, as example, Spanish and Italian are more similar than Italian and Latin or Spanish and Latin.
    Besides, considering one by one the above characteristics, the closeness can change: phonetic considerations could give reason to Sardianian and Italian (see Mario Pei studies), vocabulary to Italian, Morphology to Romanian because it has retained declensions but to the other romance languages for verbal conjugations, syntax is a battle among Italian, Spanish, written French and Portuguese.
    My answer is Italian, also for Geographical/linguistic consideration (think as example to La Spezia-Rimini line of separation between Romance languages, it springs in Italy). In any case, I have to admit, it can be difficult to say

    Ciao
     

    LaSmarjeZ

    Member
    Sardinia - Italy
    From wikipedia:

    Il sardo logudorese è uno dei due principali gruppi dialettali della lingua sarda, parlato nella parte centrale e settentrionale della Sardegna.
    Comprende le varianti del "logudorese comune" e del sardo "nuorese", ed è considerata la più conservativa delle lingue neolatine, la più simile cioè al latino.

    Sardu logudorese, or Logudorese, is a standardised dialect of Sardinian, often considered the most conservative of all Romance languages.






     

    LaSmarjeZ

    Member
    Sardinia - Italy
    Cnaeius said:
    In my opinion, in order to evaluate a global closeness to Latin, a lot of considerations have to be done. The main ones:
    • Phonetic considerations
    • Vocabulary (the topic actually is on this)
    • Morphology
    • Syntax
    Considering all these and giving a general, mean answer, I would say that the closest is Italian. But, obviously, this does not mean that the other Romance languages are far. They are however very close. I would say that, as example, Spanish and Italian are more similar than Italian and Latin or Spanish and Latin.
    Besides, considering one by one the above characteristics, the closeness can change: phonetic considerations could give reason to Sardianian and Italian (see Mario Pei studies), vocabulary to Italian, Morphology to Romanian because it has retained declensions but to the other romance languages for verbal conjugations, syntax is a battle among Italian, Spanish, written French and Portuguese.
    My answer is Italian, also for Geographical/linguistic consideration (think as example to La Spezia-Rimini line of separation between Romance languages, it springs in Italy). In any case, I have to admit, it can be difficult to say

    Ciao
    Also about verbs:

    Latin:
    Honorare
    -honoro
    -honoras
    -honorat
    -honoramus
    -honoratis
    -honorant

    Sardinian:
    Onorare
    -Deu onoro
    -tue onoras
    -issu/issa onorat
    -nosu onoramus
    -bois onorais
    -issus/issas onorant
     

    parakseno

    Senior Member
    Romanian, Romania
    j3st3r said:
    But Romanian has assimilated so many Slavic influences that I think it is no longer very close to Latin.
    It is true that Romanian assimilated Slavic unfluences, but they were at vocabulary level. Furthermore, most of these words are becoming "deprecated" and are less commonly used in spoken-language. They give a somewhat "old" touch when used. Most date back to the Early Middle Ages when the orthodox rituals were held in Slavonic language and most of the religious texts entered the country through the Slavic channel.
    Also, during the 18th and 19th century, a lot of Latin-derived words re-entered the language through French and Italian.
    Slavic influences in grammar are practically inexistant.
    So I would say that Slavic influence left little impact on Romanian overall, the most important being at vocabulary level.
     

    jester.

    Senior Member
    Germany -> German
    Intersting. I didn't know all that, I don't speak Romanian myself.

    But I am aware of one decisive feature which distinguishes Romanian from all other Romance languages and that is the article which goes behind the noun.

    But I am not certain whether this is a slavic influence...
     

    diegodbs

    Senior Member
    Spain-Spanish
    Latin:
    Honorare
    -honoro
    -honoras
    -honorat
    -honoramus
    -honoratis
    -honorant

    Sardinian:
    Onorare
    -Deu onoro
    -tue onoras
    -issu/issa onorat
    -nosu onoramus
    -bois onorais
    -issus/issas onorant
    Spanish:

    Honrar
    - honro
    - honras
    - honra
    - honramos
    - honráis
    - honran.
     

    vince

    Senior Member
    English
    From wikipedia:

    All Romance languages descend from Vulgar Latin, the language of soldiers, settlers, and slaves of the Roman Empire, which was substantially different from the Classical Latin of the Roman literati. Between 200 BC and 100 AD, the expansion of the Empire, coupled with administrative and educational policies of Rome, made Vulgar Latin the dominant native language over a wide area spanning from the Iberian Peninsula to the Western coast of the Black Sea. During the Empire's decadence and after its collapse and fragmentation in 5th century, Vulgar Latin began to evolve independently within each local area, and eventually diverged into dozens of distinct languages.
     

    Juri

    Senior Member
    italian/Slovenia
    I'm convinced it is Italian.(But don't know about Portuguese)
    A curiosity: Latin teaches us to use correctly the comma.There have been many phrases with dual meaning, depending of the right position of the comma.One is:
    Ibis redibis, non morieris in bello.=If you return, you will not die in war.
    Ibis redibis non, morieris in bello.= If you don't return, you will die in war.
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    j3st3r said:
    But I am aware of one decisive feature which distinguishes Romanian from all other Romance languages and that is the article which goes behind the noun.

    But I am not certain whether this is a slavic influence...
    It's a feature common to many languages of the Balcans. Not all similarities between languages are genetic: Sprachbund.
     

    laurika

    Senior Member
    Slovakian
    hi, well, giving the answer to the question put at the heading: the Latin as already told is "mother" for Neolatin or Roman languages: Italian, Spanish, French, Portugese, Romanian. All of them developed from Latin, as VINCE wrote, and many non-Roman languages were influenced by LAtin: in terms od vocabulary, or grammatical features, or morphology, and pronunciation. In Slovak language we find: orať that means to plough, and comes from arare, and many other words. I find it very easy to learn Italian, as well as many words are of Latin origin, often the only thing I have to do is to change the suffix. But only talking about words.
    I´d say, in my opinion, the closest language to Latin in terms of vocabulary is Italian. But all of the European languages are more or less influenced by Latin thanks to historical facts that made the Latin spread also beyond the boundaries od Europe.

    bye:)
     

    Brazilian dude

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    diegodbs said:
    Spanish:

    Honrar
    - honro
    - honras
    - honra
    - honramos
    - honráis
    - honran.
    In Portuguese:
    Honrar
    honro
    honras
    honra
    honramos
    honrais
    honram

    I think Italian is the closest to Latin in terms of vocabulary, but I have the impression Portuguese verbs are the closest to Latin.

    Brazilian dude
     

    kamome

    Senior Member
    italian - italy

    I need to mostly agree to this: I am italian and a teacher of linguistics and language philosophy, my peculiar "technical/phonetical" studies' domain in glottology are the neo-latin idioms and languages, and I underline once more that the main and "most respectful to latin" speakings are to be found among the "minor neolatin languages" and in a wide amount of "dialects" - although this last definition can NEVER be considered correct in some 85% of the cases, being the dialect a modification/corruption of a MOTHER SPEAKING, whereas a LANGUAGE has a newborn grammar founded on the common MOTHER, but actually becoming a NEW L2...anyway, IMHO, italian seems to be the MAIN daughter to such a mother, even if french tenses and CONSECUTIO TEMPORUM are sometimes nearer to the latin "division/sequence of time".

    I love translating said:
    Once my cousin (who is a priest) and I were talking about Latin, as I was wondering if he agreed that Latin was one of the most difficult languages to learn. During our conversation, he mentioned that when priests are sent to small towns where no Italian is spoken or if the priest does not speak Italian, the priest would speak Latin and that way be able to communicate with the townspeople.

    Given this, I would say Italian is the language that shares the most words with Latin, but would really like to hear the opinion of an Italian native.

    ILT

     

    Qcumber

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Among all Romance languages, French is the remotest from Latin because of the strong Celtic background and the stong Germanic influence.
     

    vince

    Senior Member
    English
    How about Romanian? It also looks really different from Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, and Italian (although the one it is least farthest from is Italian). I think it's the Slavic and Finno-Ugric influence.
     

    Juri

    Senior Member
    italian/Slovenia
    Contacting Rumanians during Congresses,I came out that in the ancient Roman province Dacia, which became in the 6th/7th century a Romanic island in a Slavic sea, Latin was spoken.Of course it has been influenced by Slavic languages only in a not big vocabulary level. Slavic languages f.i.don't know article as Rumanian,Italian, French, Spanish,Portuguese.But did'nt Latin have article? Partially true.
    The italian definite articles "il,lo,la" come from Latin:ille pater, illa mater, in ages transformed in il pater, la mater.

    Finno-ungric is only Hungarian and Finnic.
     

    vince

    Senior Member
    English
    estonian is also Finno-Ugric, as well as some minority languages spoken in northern Russia.

    I believe Bulgaro-Macedonian also has articles, but this may be a case of Romanian influencing Slavic. But the fact that the article is placed after the noun instead of before the noun in other Romance languages is very peculiar.
     

    linguist786

    Senior Member
    English, Gujarati & Urdu
    Whodunit said:
    Just thinking of the easiest phrases. Everyone understands them and these are the first ones I learned in Latin:

    Britannia insula est.
    (noun) (object) (verb)

    Great Britan is an island.

    ----------------------------

    Errare humanum est.
    (noun) (object) (verb)

    To err is human.

    ----------------------------

    Is there any language out there that uses exactly the same structure? :)
    Not that this has got anything to do with Latin, but Hindi and Gujarati has structure like that. (But i don't see how they're related!! maybe, you never know!)
     

    jester.

    Senior Member
    Germany -> German
    vince said:
    estonian is also Finno-Ugric, as well as some minority languages spoken in northern Russia.

    I believe Bulgaro-Macedonian also has articles, but this may be a case of Romanian influencing Slavic. But the fact that the article is placed after the noun instead of before the noun in other Romance languages is very peculiar.
    @ juri: I have to say that vince is absolutely right about the two points.
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    Juri said:
    Contacting Rumanians during Congresses,I came out that in the ancient Roman province Dacia, which became in the 6th/7th century a Romanic island in a Slavic sea, Latin was spoken.Of course it has been influenced by Slavic languages only in a not big vocabulary level. Slavic languages f.i.don't know article as Rumanian,Italian, French, Spanish,Portuguese.But did'nt Latin have article? Partially true.
    The italian definite articles "il,lo,la" come from Latin:ille pater, illa mater, in ages transformed in il pater, la mater.

    Finno-ungric is only Hungarian and Finnic.
    Latin had no definite article. The definite articles of Romance languages are derived from demonstratives.

    Slavic languages of the Balcanic Sprachbund, however, do have definite articles.
     

    robbie_SWE

    Senior Member
    Trilingual: Swedish, Romanian & English
    I don't know if it has anything to do with it, but Nordic languages put the definitive article after the noun, similar to Romanian.

    Swedish
    en hund (a dog) = hunden (the dog)
    en bil (a car) = bilen (the car)

    How the Romanian language received this is an enigma. In my opinion, Italian and Romanian are closest to Latin. Because Romanian is my first language, it took me only a couple of months to learn Italian. N.B. only 10 % of Romanian vocabulary comes from Slavic languages and this number is decreasing.

    Cogito ergo sum ;-)
     

    jester.

    Senior Member
    Germany -> German
    robbie_SWE said:
    How the Romanian language received this is an enigma.
    Not quite. It's a typical feature of Balkan languages. You might want to have a look at the Wikipedia article on the Romanian language in order to find something about that phenomenon.
     

    涼宮

    Senior Member
    Sbaeneg/Castellano (Venezuela)
    I agree that Italian is the closest to Latin in vocabulary, but Romanian in grammar, What about Occitan? It is a romance language too, How different it can be?
     

    Alacritas

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Cnaeius said:
    In my opinion, in order to evaluate a global closeness to Latin, a lot of considerations have to be done. The main ones:

    Phonetic considerations

    Vocabulary (the topic actually is on this)

    Morphology

    Syntax
    This is really important, because a language could change drastically on a phonological level but be much more conservative as regards morphology/syntax/vocabulary. A good example would be Icelandic (which I know little about, so please correct me if I make a mistake here): from what I've heard, native Icelandic speakers can read Old Norse texts with relative ease (relative, compared to other speakers of North Germanic languages), but the pronunciation is radically different.

    At any rate, comparing any of the Romance languages to Classical Latin is somewhat silly; it makes more sense to compare them to Vulgar Latin, as that is their more recent common ancestor.

    So if we're to look at each one of the above domains individually, comparing them with Vulgar Latin:

    Phonetics -- that's probably Sardinian or Italian. They both obviously changed, but when compared to the others, they seem much closer.

    Vocabulary -- that would also be to Sardinian or Italian. Probably more sardinian. When I try to read Sardinian it always reminds me of Latin, much more than other Romance languages I don't know but try to read anyway. That's to say, when I try to read a Romance language that I haven't studied previously, my knowledge of other Romance languages helps more than my (smaller) knowledge of Latin. However, when I attempt to read Sardinian, my Latin knowledge seems to play a bigger role. This is obviously quite subjective...

    Morphology -- this would go to either Romanian or Sardinian, considering the declensions in Romanian and the verb paradigms of Sardinian.

    Syntax -- you got me, I have no clue which would be closer. My gut feeling tells me Sardinian, just from the bit of reading I've tried to do in it. Italian seems much closer to the popular Romance languages (French, Spanish, Portuguese, etc.).


    Overall then I would go with Sardinian, with Italian (probably not standard, but some dialect, but that's just a feeling, not a very informed opinion) coming in second.

    PS
    What would be fascinating is for a Romance specialist (who also is well versed in Latin, as the good ones should be) to come along and either tell us all what's up, or spell out how a formal study of the relationship between the Neo-Latin languages and Vulgar and/or Classical Latin would be done.
     
    It's interesting to turn the question round and ask: How much (if any) of each modern Romance language would a native of the city of Rome (not the Provinces), used to Vulgar Latin, be able to understand in (a) the speech; and (b) the (upper case) writing?

    My guess is that Italian would still come first, but I suspect that English would figure somewhere down the list so far as the writing is concerned.
     

    IoanS

    New Member
    Romanian/English
    Romanian is the closest language to Latin. Although Italian is a close second, many only consider it the closest to classic Latin due to the fact the Latin was derived from the Latins in ancient Rome. Romanian shares many of the same grammar and vocabulary rules as classic Latin and the only reason why people forget to mention that is because Romanian is an "island" language, meaning that it has been cut off from its language relatives due to the breakup of the Roman Empire and constant warfare in between the areas of Italy and Romania. Romania is bordered by a few Slavic countries but it has only acquired few to no slavic loan words.
    Example: from above written post-Romanian: Român este cel mai apropiat de limba latină. Deşi italian este un apropiat al doilea, multi considera doar cel mai apropiat de clasic latin, datorită faptului latin a fost derivat de la latinii din Roma antică. Romanian parts multe din aceeaşi gramatică şi vocabular ca regulile clasice Latină şi singurul motiv pentru care oamenii au uitat să menţionez că este românesc, deoarece este o "insulă" limbaj, ceea ce înseamnă că a fost tăiat de la rudele limba din cauza destramarea Imperiul Roman şi constantă în război între zone din Italia şi România. România se învecinează cu câteva ţări slave, dar le-a dobândit doar cateva cuvinte pentru a nu împrumut slave.
    Latin:Romanian proxima est sermo Latin. Cum prope est Italian Secundo modo pluribus Existimo proxima classic Latin debetur, factum ex Latinis Latinos Strabonis. Romanian partes plures idem Grammatices praecepta vocabulary cum Latina classic Nee ob obliviscatur populus mentionem Nulla Romanian est "Insula" Language, id qui quod periit ab fratribus eius sermone debetur breakup of Romani regni constantibus bellis inter areas in Italia Romania. Romania est terminus Slavic paucis regionibus, sed acquirere tam paucis verbis mutuo Slavic.
     

    Laranja

    New Member
    Brazilian Portuguese
    I find it tremendously difficult to see Romanian as the closest language to Latin. It's true that is has preserved the declensions, but the vocabulary seems quite different, or at least the words have suffered strong modifications.

    I am able to comprehend, in a bigger or smaller degree, most of romance languages (Castillan, Catalan, French, Italian, Occitan, Sardinian...), and my understanding has improved since I began to take Latin classes. But I can't understand Romanian. But maybe it's only a matter to get used to...
     

    relativamente

    Senior Member
    catalan and spanish
    This question about which language is closest to Latin is very difficult or imposible to answer and all things i read here seem to me just personal opinions but not based in serious studies.All romance languages have preserved some features of Latin and have changed others. The vocabulary of Romanian has for example the word "alb" to say white which is exactly like classical Latin albus, while other romance have changed to a non latin word derived from Germanic blank.Other words have changed their meaning like the word for man is "barbat" literally meaning "having a beard".
    Regarding grammar, it is true that some cases have been preserved to a certain extend better than in other language and also the neuter gender, beeing somne new words neuter like taxi,whereas car is femenine.The plural neuter ending uri, example taxiuri is not typical of Latin.
    But on the other hand de future is not from classical latin what also happens in other romance but in Romanian is different from the others and more complex, since there is more than one way to form the future.Also the subjunctive mode is almost desappeared and only applies to the third persons.Also the infinitive is different.
     

    Copperknickers

    Senior Member
    Scotland - Scots and English
    I find it tremendously difficult to see Romanian as the closest language to Latin. It's true that is has preserved the declensions, but the vocabulary seems quite different, or at least the words have suffered strong modifications.

    I am able to comprehend, in a bigger or smaller degree, most of romance languages (Castillan, Catalan, French, Italian, Occitan, Sardinian...), and my understanding has improved since I began to take Latin classes. But I can't understand Romanian. But maybe it's only a matter to get used to...
    I can understand quite a bit being versed in French, Italian and Latin. A lot of the vocabulary is different in terms of different words, eg 'apropiat' is pretty clear in its Latin derivation, moreso than the French 'proche' to 'proxima'. Neither is more seperate from Latin, just the idiom has drifted more in Romanian.
     
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