Monday week

sylade

New Member
Polish
Hey,

Could anyone explain me what actually mean "Monday week" in this context:
We came today about your boiler but no-one was in. I'm afraid that we can't get anyone out to see you until Monday week
?
 
  • The Prof

    Senior Member
    'Monday week' means the same as 'a week on/next Monday'.

    In other words, if this had been said to you today (Tuesday), I would assume that it did not mean the Monday of next week (12 August), but the Monday of the week after that (19 August).
     
    Last edited:

    JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    I think it's the same thing as what in AmE we'd refer to as "a week from next Monday." I do hope a BE speaker will correct me if I'm wrong, because this is something I've wondered off and on myself. So for example, next Monday is August 12 (or 12 August) - would "Monday week" mean "August 19"?

    (Cross-posted with the Prof, who has answered my question. Thanks!)
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Yourdictionary.com says: "The definition of a Monday week is a period of seven days beginning with Monday."

    That's the way I would define it as well.

    "A week on Monday" meant nothing to me (AE) until I saw The Prof's definition..

    Cross-cross posted.
    :)
     

    sylade

    New Member
    Polish
    But why can't say "Monday week" when I mean the Monday of next week (12 August) ? Actually next week starts from Monday. I'm a little bit confused.
     

    The Prof

    Senior Member
    But why can't say "Monday week" when I mean the Monday of next week (12 August) ? Actually next week starts from Monday. I'm a little bit confused.
    In that case, we would simply say "next Monday". "Monday week" means next Monday plus one week.

    (And actually, I was always taught that here in the UK a week officially begins on Sunday, though that does not have any bearing on the expression in question.)
     
    Last edited:

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    But why can't say "Monday week" when I mean the Monday of next week (12 August) ? Actually next week starts from Monday. I'm a little bit confused.
    You're asking why you cannot use an expression with a meaning other than that in common usage and found in dictionaries.

    The answer to that should be obvious.

    Don't get hung up by your suggestion that weeks start with a Monday (in the U.S. it does not). Here "week" just means seven days.

    Edit: if you're talking about Aug. 12, use The Prof's good advice above.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    We've had some similar discussions before. For example, have a look at:

    a week from Tuesday
    Thursday week 8a.m.
    a week Thursday
    This Thursday Next Thursday
    It would seem that there is much variation. Monday week is not an expression I would use but I've heard it used. I would say 'a week on Monday' for 'the coming Monday + one week' (like what JustKate said), and this is how I would understand 'Monday week' to mean that.
     

    goldencypress

    Senior Member
    India - Malayalam
    Yourdictionary.com says: "The definition of a Monday week is a period of seven days beginning with Monday."

    That's the way I would define it as well.

    "A week on Monday" meant nothing to me (AE) until I saw The Prof's definition..

    Cross-cross posted.
    :)
    Is there such a usage as "The Monday after next" next meaning next Monday?
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Is there such a usage as "The Monday after next" next meaning next Monday?
    No. That is not what it means at all.

    If, on the red Tuesday, you say, "The Monday after next", you mean the blue Monday

    Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday,
    Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday,
    Sunday, Monday (the Monday after next), Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday,
     

    goldencypress

    Senior Member
    India - Malayalam
    No. That is not what it means at all.

    If, on the red Tuesday, you say, "The Monday after next", you mean the blue Monday

    Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday,
    Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday,
    Sunday, Monday (the Monday after next), Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday,
    If on red Tuesday, I said Monday week it would mean the blue Monday, wouldn't it? So doesn't "Monday week" and "the Monday after next" mean the same thing? Is there really such a usage as "the Monday after next"?
     

    goldencypress

    Senior Member
    India - Malayalam
    Today is Saturday. I have marked THIS Wednesday and Wednesday WEEK. Am I correct?


    Sunday

    Monday

    Tuesday

    Wednesday (This Wednesday)

    Thursday

    Friday

    Saturday

    Sunday

    Monday

    Tuesday

    Wednesday (Wednesday week)
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    So doesn't "Monday week" and "the Monday after next" mean the same thing?
    Yes. There could be situations in which one or both might be inappropriate.
    Is there really such a usage as "the Monday after next"?
    Yes, I've heard it.
    Today is Saturday. I have marked THIS Wednesday and Wednesday WEEK. Am I correct?
    I assume you mean today is the Saturday before the first day in the list, which is Sunday. I wouldn't use "this Wednesday" but "Wednesday next week". You're correct with your use of "Wednesday week".
     

    goldencypress

    Senior Member
    India - Malayalam
    Yes. There could be situations in which one or both might be inappropriate.

    Yes, I've heard it.

    I assume you mean today is the Saturday before the first day in the list, which is Sunday. I wouldn't use "this Wednesday" but "Wednesday next week". You're correct with your use of "Wednesday week".
    Thank you, Barque
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Today is Saturday 17th March.

    If you said this Wednesday, I would understand that to mean the Wednesday of the same week - ie 14th March.

    I would refer to 21st March as next Wednesday or the coming Wednesday.

    If you said Wednesday week, I would understand that to mean 28th March. It is not a term I use; I might say a week on Wednesday or even the second Wednesday from today or the Wednesday after next.
     

    Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Today is Saturday. I have marked THIS Wednesday and Wednesday WEEK. Am I correct?

    Saturday TODAY

    Sunday

    Monday

    Tuesday

    Wednesday (This Wednesday)

    Thursday

    Friday

    Saturday

    Sunday

    Monday

    Tuesday

    Wednesday (Wednesday week)

    :tick: That is correct. However for 'this Wednesday' you can also say 'on Wednesday'.

    E.g.

    I'm going to visit my friend this Wednesday = I'm going to visit my friend on Wednesday

    Also

    I'm going to visit my friend a week on Wednesday = I'm going to visit my friend Wednesday week.
     

    goldencypress

    Senior Member
    India - Malayalam
    Today is Saturday 17th March.

    If you said this Wednesday, I would understand that to mean the Wednesday of the same week - ie 14th March.

    I would refer to 21st March as next Wednesday or the coming Wednesday.

    If you said Wednesday week, I would understand that to mean 28th March. It is not a term I use; I might say a week on Wednesday or even the second Wednesday from today or the Wednesday after next.
    Thank you, natkretep. You have made things perfectly clear.
     

    goldencypress

    Senior Member
    India - Malayalam
    :tick: That is correct. However for 'this Wednesday' you can also say 'on Wednesday'.

    E.g.

    I'm going to visit my friend this Wednesday = I'm going to visit my friend on Wednesday

    Also

    Can't "I am going to visit my friend on Wednesday" mean ANY Wednesday? I don't think it is very specific.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Today is Saturday 17th March.
    If you said this Wednesday, I would understand that to mean the Wednesday of the same week - ie 14th March.
    I'm going to visit my friend this Wednesday = I'm going to visit my friend on Wednesday
    You can see the danger of saying "this Wednesday". natkretep sees it as possibly being in the past, Chasint sees it as being in the future (as do I). If today is Saturday 17 March then Wednesday 14 March is, for me, "last Wednesday", not "this Wednesday".

    And do not ever say "Wednesday next" - which to some people means "next Wednesday" and to others means "a week on Wednesday". I haven't heard it for a while, but remember it causing confusion when I was young.
     

    Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    ...
    And do not ever say "Wednesday next" - which to some people means "next Wednesday" and to others means "a week on Wednesday". I haven't heard it for a while, but remember it causing confusion when I was young.
    In fact there is a confusion in the English language (In Britain anyway). Different people use 'next' in different ways. This applies to transport as well.

    I'm getting off at the next stop.
    For some native speakers this means the nearest stop. For others it means the one after that. It is a constant source of confusion!

    I personally avoid this by saying, I'm getting off at this stop or I'm getting off at the stop after this one.
     
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