Moneta

Marc1

Banned
Italian / Spanish / German.
Italians in Australia refer to money as "moneta".
Is this an acceptable use in Italy? Isn't money = soldi ?
Moneta = coin...?
 
  • carlafed

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Moneta is 'coin' , but also 'change'
    Hai della moneta? Do you have change? (=coins)
    It is also used to mean the money of a nation, for instance:
    L'euro è la moneta italiana e europea
    Il dollaro è la moneta statunitense

    The correct word for money is denaro
    You can also use soldi (always plural in this case), more colloquial.
    I have no money= Non ho soldi = non ho denaro
    It is exactly the same, although "non ho soldi" is slightly more colloquial.
    Of course you have plenty of regional expressions to give the idea ;-)
     

    Silvia

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Aren't they referring to their credit card?

    Carta Moneta is a kind of credit card issued by several Italian banks (which are part of the INTESA group) and it allows you to spend money through this system called "moneta", either through VISA or MASTERCARD circuit.

    When you're at the cash and you give them your credit card, they might ask: "bancomat o moneta?" Bancomat is when they charge you immediately, moneta is when the money will be debited at the end of the month or so, depending on the bank conditions.

    To know more:
    http://www.bancaintesa.it/piu/jsp/Home

    Or maybe you were not talking about Italian tourists in Australia... who knows? :D
     

    Marc1

    Banned
    Italian / Spanish / German.
    silviap said:
    Aren't they referring to their credit card?

    Carta Moneta is a kind of credit card issued by several Italian banks (which are part of the INTESA group) and it allows you to spend money through this system called "moneta", either through VISA or MASTERCARD circuit.

    When you're at the cash and you give them your credit card, they might ask: "bancomat o moneta?" Bancomat is when they charge you immediately, moneta is when the money will be debited at the end of the month or so, depending on the bank conditions.

    To know more:
    http://www.bancaintesa.it/piu/jsp/Home

    Or maybe you were not talking about Italian tourists in Australia... who knows? :D
    Italian born who now live in Australia, when they speak their own language refer to money invariably as moneta. "Non ho moneta", "Ho riscosso la moneta" I am going to pick up the money = Vado a raccogliere la moneta" made me think that not only they where getting paid far too little (ony coins) but they had to pick it up from the ground ... ;)

    So, soldi is informal, should be denaro, thank you !
     

    walnut

    Senior Member
    Italy - Italian
    The elderly among my italo-american relatives used 'moneta' in the same way. This sort of broccolino-english expressions comes from dialect; people migrating to the US and Australia in last century were often poor and not educated, and their italian was very poor too - they only knew dialects for talking. Italian dialects are often uncorrect if rapported to official language.
    I often couldn't even understand my grandma's sisters when talking italian. They lived in the US and were italian mothertongues, but actually spoke a kind of 'sicilian' mixed to USenglish elements... :p it was great fun for us and often impossible to understand!

    Ciao! Walnut
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top