moo-gun

nile84

Senior Member
Persian
Hello

Elsa has brought some cookies and a quart of milk for the dog; she gives it the cookies and then:

Elsa takes the milk and goes looking for her moo-gun.
[My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She's Sorry - by Fredrik Backman]

I googled the word "moo-gun" but I couldn't find anything.
Would you please help me with it?
 
  • Scott AM

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    I suggest you keep reading. You'll find a definition soon enough. ;)

    But it's not a standard English word, in any case.
     

    Trochfa

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Elsa takes the milk and goes looking for her moo-gun.
    It appears that it is an imaginary gun, for fighting things in her nightmares. "Moo-gun" implies a gun for fending off things which "moo" [i.e. cows]. This ties in with the fact that she has just been giving milk to the dog. [I don't know what nightmares she's been having, because Google Books doesn't display that page, but earlier it says that she's frightened of shadows, ghosts and Britt-Marie.]

    The fact that it is an imaginary gun is reinforced by the text before that in the OP. She has three tins of dreams [cookies], of which the dog eats two and a half tins worth. Elsa has already told the dog that it can have two of the tins but she needs the third as "ammunition", presumably for the "moo-gun". However, the greedy dog has only left her with half a tin of cookies to use.

    My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She's Sorry
     

    Scott AM

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    It appears that it is an imaginary gun, for fighting things in her nightmares. "Moo-gun" implies a gun for fending off things which "moo" [i.e. cows]. This ties in with the fact that she has just been giving milk to the dog. [I don't know what nightmares she's been having, because Google Books doesn't display that page, but earlier it says that she's frightened of shadows, ghosts and Britt-Marie.]

    The fact that it is an imaginary gun is reinforced by the text before that in the OP. She has three tins of dreams [cookies], of which the dog eats two and a half tins worth. Elsa has already told the dog that it can have two of the tins but she needs the third as "ammunition", presumably for the "moo-gun". However, the greedy dog has only left her with half a tin of cookies to use.

    My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She's Sorry
    Hope you're happy. Now everyone will want one.
     

    Trochfa

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Possibly, if they can understand my bizarre ramblings! Although I don't think Hermione will be first in the queue. :)
     

    nile84

    Senior Member
    Persian
    It appears that it is an imaginary gun, for fighting things in her nightmares. "Moo-gun" implies a gun for fending off things which "moo" [i.e. cows]. This ties in with the fact that she has just been giving milk to the dog. [I don't know what nightmares she's been having, because Google Books doesn't display that page, but earlier it says that she's frightened of shadows, ghosts and Britt-Marie.]

    The fact that it is an imaginary gun is reinforced by the text before that in the OP. She has three tins of dreams [cookies], of which the dog eats two and a half tins worth. Elsa has already told the dog that it can have two of the tins but she needs the third as "ammunition", presumably for the "moo-gun". However, the greedy dog has only left her with half a tin of cookies to use.

    My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She's Sorry
    Thank you, Trochfa.
    In fact moo-gun is not something imaginary. Elsa does have one in real world; and dreams are names of the cookies.
    I still don't have an exact image of a moo-gun in my mind; but I assume it might be something like a water gun, since Elsa is going to feed the dog with that gun (I'm not sure, though.)
     

    nile84

    Senior Member
    Persian
    ooops!
    Just a few lines further, and it's being explained! (Thank you, Scott!)

    Someone who doesn’t know better might mistake a moo-gun for a quite ordinary paintball gun customised by someone’s granny with a milk carton at the side and a catapult glued to the top. Elsa, though, knows what she’s got in her hands. She loads the carton with milk and puts a cookie in the firing chamber in front of the rubber band on the cookie gun.

    Thanks, everybody.
    By the way, it's a very lovely book.
     

    Trochfa

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Thanks for explaning nile84. I couldn't read that part of the book in the free preview I found online. It makes sense now.
     
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