Morally, however, it regulates turn-taking which inevitably involves issues of fairness, ...

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hazelnut0103

New Member
korean
Hello,
While I'm studying English with the passage below, I just wonder the exact meaning of the sentence,

"Morally, however, it regulates turn-taking which inevitably involves issues of fairness, respect for others, patience, and self-control."
from the image file below.

1. In this case, does the word "regulates" mean "restrict"?
2. Does the underlined phrase indicate "raising hands" or "turning-taking".
3. If it means "raising hands", isn't a comma omitted before which?

Please kindly answer these questions for a poor non-English-speaker in trouble.^^
 

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  • Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hello Hazelnut,

    1. In this case, does the word "regulates" mean "restrict"?
    2. Does the underlined phrase indicate "raising hands" or "turning-taking".
    3. If it means "raising hands", isn't a comma omitted before which?
    1. It means controls: the aim is not to restrict the number of questions, but to ensure that different pupils can ask questions, that the same pupil doesn't ask all the questions.
    2. It refers to turn-taking (it's not turning-taking))
    3. It would be better with a comma, as you suggest.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    "Morally, however, it regulates turn-taking which inevitably involves issues of fairness, respect for others, patience, and self-control."
    from the image file below.

    2. Does the underlined phrase indicate "raising hands" or "turning-taking".
    Yes, there should be a comma before “which”, since it introduces a non-restrictive relative clause. But what it refers back to is the whole phrase “it regulates turn-taking”, the meaning being that that practice (that is, regulating turn-taking) inevitably involves those issues.
     
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