Morda

katie_here

Senior Member
England/English
One of our young Polish lads told me to say this to someone else, (they like to shock and tease me!!) I said I wouldn't say it until I knew what it meant. It was in reply to another saying (another swear word, I don't like to write. ) Sp...r D.l.. . Whatever it was, they thought it was really funny!!

So thankyou in advance. :)
 
  • Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    One of our young Polish lads told me to say this to someone else, (they like to shock and tease me!!) I said I wouldn't say it until I knew what it meant. It was in reply to another saying (another swear word, I don't like to write. ) Sp...r D.l.. . Whatever it was, they thought it was really funny!!

    So thankyou in advance. :)
    It can mean various things.
    In this case I think it means: shut up!
    Needless to say it is a pretty robust retort.

    It comes from morda w kubeł which can be translated as keep your trap shut.

    Tom
     

    katie_here

    Senior Member
    England/English
    Thank you so much. It's not as bad as I thought!!! :) . You can imagine the scene, Three 20 something young lads trying to outsmart a lady in her 40's!!! It was the English one who swore in Polish, and the Polish one who told me what to reply. Another wouldn't tell me what it meant, but to look it up on a translator. All I could find was "mug" which didn't seem right.

    Anyway, if it means "shut up" I can find plenty of opportunity to say it!! :)
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Caveat: if you have to use it do it among people you know they won't take offenc at it, I would strongly disadvise using it towards/among strangers. ;) In my opinion it is stronger than English shut up!

    Tom-
     

    katie_here

    Senior Member
    England/English
    Caveat: if you have to use it do it among people you know they won't take offenc at it, I would strongly disadvise using it towards/among strangers. ;) In my opinion it is stronger than English shut up!

    Tom-


    Thanks. Rest assured it will only be used for these cheeky young men when they get a bit lippy. They are just having fun. I think they've never met anyone before who is the age of their mothers, but they can't shock!. :). I have just to keep one step ahead!.

    Perfect strangers? I have enough good English words for those!! ;)
     

    dn88

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Haha, the only expression in which "morda" means something positive that I can think of right now is "mordo ty moja". :D

    I guess the most common way of telling someone to shut up is simply "zamknij się".
     

    mcibor

    Senior Member
    Haha, the only expression in which "morda" means something positive that I can think of right now is "mordo ty moja". :D

    I guess the most common way of telling someone to shut up is simply "zamknij się".

    I must disagree with you. Though it is supposed to be common, in my opinion "morda w kubeł" is used more often.

    I personally never use "zamknij się" (shut up), whereas "morda w kubeł" (jap into bucket) I would consider worth in some scenarios :)

    If you wish, Kate, you could consider such "polite" answers to S word:

    - Za tobą (after you, with hand gesture)
    - Mów do mnie jeszcze (talk to me more - taken from cabaret)
    - Też cię lubię (I like you too - with irony)

    Take care and have fun!
     

    dn88

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I must disagree with you. Though it is supposed to be common, in my opinion "morda w kubeł" is used more often.

    I personally never use "zamknij się" (shut up), whereas "morda w kubeł" (jap into bucket) I would consider worth in some scenarios :)

    If you wish, Kate, you could consider such "polite" answers to S word:

    - Za tobą (after you, with hand gesture)
    - Mów do mnie jeszcze (talk to me more - taken from cabaret)
    - Też cię lubię (I like you too - with irony)

    Take care and have fun!

    Maybe, maybe not. If I'm honest, I think I've never said "morda w kubeł" to anyone in my whole life.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Dn88, perhaps morda w kubeł doesn't belong in your vocabulary.
    I certainly have used morda w kubeł in my life on a few occasions, it seems to me I did this when I was a kid. Now, I've grown out of it. :p I don't, however, hear it often. In retrospection I haven't heard it in a while. Morda, yes, but not the former, is pretty often used by gimnazjaliści (teenagers aged roughly from 12 to 15) at least this is in whom I have experienced the word most often.

    I think that zamknij się is used by more people though. It is milder in tone and doesn't bring about negative connotations as morda does.

    What is the most common way of telling someone to pipe down may be contingent upon where and by/among whom it is to be used.
    A different way will be used by a teacher, teenagers, a university professor, street sweeper, etc. also differentiated by entourage.
    - Za tobą (after you, with hand gesture)
    - Mów do mnie jeszcze (talk to me more - taken from cabaret)
    - Też cię lubię (I like you too - with irony)
    I would label the second and third ones as not mainstream. They seem to be more "sophisticated" options. I haven't heard the first one in the meaning in question.


    [...] "morda w kubeł" (jap into bucket) [...]
    Michał, could you please give a source where you found jap as an equivalent of morda?

    Tom
     

    dn88

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Dn88, perhaps morda w kubeł doesn't belong in your vocabulary.
    I certainly have used morda w kubeł in my life on a few occasions, it seems to me I did this when I was a kid. Now, I've grown out of it. :p I don't, however, hear it often. In retrospection I haven't heard it in a while. Morda, yes, but not the former, is pretty often used by gimnazjaliści (teenagers aged roughly from 12 to 15) at least this is in whom I have experienced the word most often.

    I think that zamknij się is used by more people though. It is milder in tone and doesn't bring about negative connotations as morda does.

    Yeah, "zamknij się" is really very common. And maybe it's just me, but I don't hear people around me say "morda w kubeł" all that often either.

    Michał, could you please give a source where you found jap as an equivalent of morda?

    Hehe, I don't think such a word exists in English. :D

    There's "japa" in Polish though.
     

    mcibor

    Senior Member
    Ah, my typo, it should have been
    yap - gęba; morda; jadaczka

    I moved to my own and don't have many dictionaries.
    I found it here.

    And true, most of these answers are off mainstream. But I don't know any non swear, mainstream answer to S word.
     

    Ulla

    New Member
    Polish & English
    "Morda" literally means "ugly face" or an animal's, i.e. dog's "snout". If used in referrence to persons it carries a negative, rude connotation. Another word would be "ryj" as in "pig's snout".
    You could say "zamknij ryj". It is just as rude and very strong.
    "Dam ci w mordę/ryj" is a threat of hitting someone in their face.
     

    ryba

    Senior Member
    Caveat: if you have to use it do it among people you know they won't take offenc at it, I would strongly disadvise using it towards/among strangers. ;) In my opinion it is stronger than English shut up!

    Tom-

    I agree but precisely because of being stronger it may sound funny and can be used among friends as a joke. Morda means the same as French gueule, it is a bad word for human face and it's original meaning is "animal's mouth".

    As Thomas has already noticed, this particular usage of morda comes from morda w kubeł.

    Now, if you say Zamknij się! (= shut up, literally, 'shut yourself'), I'd say it will be taken seriously in any situation. If you say Morda!, unless it is clear you're serious and there actually IS a reason for you to be angry, it is funny enough for anyone to understand you must be joking. ;)


    "Dam ci w mordę/ryj" is a threat of hitting someone in their face.
    Cześć, Ulla, witaj na forum!!! :)

    Chcesz w mordę? / Chcesz w ryj? or Chcesz w ryja?, the last one being the most colloquial/vulgar because it is agramatical (Genitive ryja instead of Accusative ryj) are the most common ways of saying it. Well, there is another way, more offensive but I don't want to get off topic. Thank's God the last time I heard it was in elementary. :D
     
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