more apparent when it comes to 'home run papers'

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  • JustKate

    Senior Member
    No, not without some context. As you've presented it, the term means nothing, but it might make plenty of sense in context. Tell us where you heard it and put it in a sentence - or even in a paragraph - and we'll probably be able to help.
     

    mO_ok

    Senior Member
    Lithuanian
    It concerns scientific research. The sentence goes like this:'This trend is even more apparent when it comes to 'home run papers' - those publications with at least a thousand citations - which were more than six times as likely to come from a team of scientists.' I know that 'home run' comes from baseball but am not sure about its meaning in this particular context. Is it something like 'victorious' or 'winning'?
     

    JustKate

    Senior Member
    When you refer to something (something that has nothing to do with baseball) as a home run, you're basically saying it was "completely successful." If a movie is a "home run," it is successful with audiences and critics, and it's also successful financially. For academic papers, the definition of "successful" here seems to be "was cited a LOT by other authors."

    While the meaning is perfectly clear in context, I have never heard anything described as a "home run paper."
     

    mO_ok

    Senior Member
    Lithuanian
    I have never came across the use of home run in other contexts than baseball. Thank you a lot!
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I have never came across the use of home run in other contexts than baseball. Thank you a lot!
    While I, like JustKate, have never heard of a "home run paper," baseball analogies, including that of a home run, are common in U.S. business. One might say "Apple's iPad Mini hit a home run with three million sales during its debut weekend." You'll also hear "we struck out" after an unsuccessful attempt to sell a product to a new customer, "I'll take a rain check" when someone wants to decline an invitation while leaving open the possibility of rescheduling it for a later date, and many more. Many U.S. businesspeople (mostly men) don't even stop to think that these metaphors are from baseball, so they use them when speaking to people who know nothing about that sport.
     
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