More busy and busier

Jin akashini

Senior Member
vietnamese
Hi,
I know that "busier" is correct in grammar but i still hear people use " more busy" :eek:
So whether I should use "more busy" in writing and speaking English ?
 
  • Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    There are few contexts where "more busy" is an acceptable alternative to "busier". I suggest that you always use "busier" - you will never be wrong in doing so.
     

    Dasky

    Member
    Arabic
    Hello,

    I would like to know which one is correct " more busy or busier " ?
    and if i said : I don't want to be more busy.
    Is that wrong?

    Thanks
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I don't think there's any situation in which you have to say "more busy" rather than "busier".

    The only situation in which I think "more busy" is likely is when it's preceded by "even": even more busy. But even then, "even busier" is perfectly acceptable/normal.

    If I were you, I'd stick with "busier":).
     

    Dasky

    Member
    Arabic
    I don't think there's any situation in which you have to say "more busy" rather than "busier".

    The only situation in which I think "more busy" is likely is when it's preceded by "even": even more busy. But even then, "even busier" is perfectly acceptable/normal.

    If I were you, I'd stick with "busier":).
    Thank you so much.
     

    Dasky

    Member
    Arabic
    << --- threads merged here --- >>

    There are few contexts where "more busy" is an acceptable alternative to "busier". I suggest that you always use "busier" - you will never be wrong in doing so.
    Can you tell us what are the cases that we should say "more busy" instead of "busier" ?
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    I can imagine (but with some difficulty) a situation in which "busier" would not work and one would have to use "more busy". It would probably involve different attributes or qualities of a person, comparing how busy they are with how XXXX they are, only I can't think of a suitable specific example for XXXX.

    If the question isn't really about "busier" vs "more busy", but generically about "XXXXer" vs "more XXXX", then consider this example:

    We're looking at some object and are disagreeing over what colour it is. In fact it's borderline green/blue, which one might describe as either greeny blue or blueish green. I might say it's blue. You might say "I think it's more green than blue". "Greener" would not work here. Although it's possible for something to be greener than blue (if you consider blue to have certain amount of greenness), that wouldn't mean quite the same thing. Here you would be expressing that its colour is closer to green than it is to blue, but something that is merely greener than blue could well still be closer to blue than to green.
     

    Dasky

    Member
    Arabic
    I can imagine (but with some difficulty) a situation in which "busier" would not work and one would have to use "more busy". It would probably involve different attributes or qualities of a person, comparing how busy they are with how XXXX they are, only I can't think of a suitable specific example for XXXX.

    If the question isn't really about "busier" vs "more busy", but generically about "XXXXer" vs "more XXXX", then consider this example:

    We're looking at some object and are disagreeing over what colour it is. In fact it's borderline green/blue, which one might describe as either greeny blue or blueish green. I might say it's blue. You might say "I think it's more green than blue". "Greener" would not work here. Although it's possible for something to be greener than blue (if you consider blue to have certain amount of greenness), that wouldn't mean quite the same thing. Here you would be expressing that its colour is closer to green than it is to blue, but something that is merely greener than blue could well still be closer to blue than to green.
    Thank you, can I say " I know that you are busy and having a pet will make you more busy" ? Is that right?
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I'm less sure about that. I think I would use busier in that example (in post 11).

    If you have different adjectives, more busy might work.

    Q: Are you going to totally inundated next weekend?
    A: Well, I'm probably going to be more busy than totally inundated.

    And that's a bit quotative in nature, so I might even use inverted commas: I'm going to be more 'busy' than 'totally inundated'.
     

    Man_from_India

    Senior Member
    Indian English
    And what about this one:
    "I have never been busier" vs "I have never been more busy"?
    Which one to choose? As everyone said the version with "busier" is always right. But I am wondering if the other version is also right, at least in this particular case?
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    This is straying away from the more busy = busier. I'm going to be more busy than totally inundated is using more as a modifier for both busy and totally inundated - it's being used as a comparator, not an intensifier. That's the same in more green than blue. The sort of context where more busy could be used to mean busier, without sounding wrong, might be I was busy yesterday, but I'm more busy today, but that is certainly a case where busier would be normal and acceptable. As I said at the beginning, there are few contexts where more busy can be used instead of busier, but using busier in those contexts is never wrong. As a rule of thumb, I'd suggest that learners of English should only use more busy in contexts where busier is clearly wrong - and that is where more is being used to make a comparison between two states (He is more busy than idle, ... more sad than happy, ... more green than blue).
     

    Dasky

    Member
    Arabic
    Thank you all

    if you please what do you think of these quotes,

    Error is always more busy than truth

    by

    Hosea Ballou

    and


    The more we do, the more we can do; the more busy we are, the more leisure we have.
    by

    Dag Hammarskjold
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    Error is always more busy than truth.
    The meaning of "more busy" here is the same as "busier", and I see no real reason why one should not use "busier" instead. Both would work. I'm not sure whether the fact that the entities which are busy are non-persons (and intangible abstract entities to boot) has any bearing on why Ballou preferred "more busy". It may just have been a more fashionable expression in his time, or it may be because it sounds more poetic. This was not just a casual statement, after all, or so I presume. It was designed to be a saying or motto to be remembered and heeded.

    The more we do, the more we can do; the more busy we are, the more leisure we have.
    I think this "more busy" also means "busier", although it could conceivably have been intended as "the more we are busy" (but in that case it would sure have been written that way).
    Clearly the reason to prefer "more busy" to "busier" here is the oratory effect of saying "the more" four times.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    The first case is a sentence written in the early 19th century and does not indicate modern usage. I think more busy is acceptable, but busier is better. In the second, there's no doubt at all - as Edinburgher says, it is an oratorial device and in that much better than busier would be in the same sentence.
     
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