more likely...by 363%

AidaGlass

Senior Member
Persian-Iran
Hello,
Is the red part correct grammatically?
People having diseases such as Asthma, diabetes, and Crohn are more likely to commit suicide by 363% compared with others.
 
  • AidaGlass

    Senior Member
    Persian-Iran
    Where did you see this sentence?
    I've written it myself. It's like, for example, 'commit suicide by two times as many as others'. But there is this 363% in the Farsi text I'm translating. I'm not sure how to write it in proper English.
     
    Last edited:

    The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I would have said something like "People having diseases such as asthma, diabetes, and Crohn's are 363% as likely to commit suicide as other people." 363% would be a little over three and a half times as likely.
     

    AidaGlass

    Senior Member
    Persian-Iran

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    It seems a little odd to me to express this as a percent when it's a simple multiplier. It seems to be an unnecessary extra piece of math and it complicates the structure of the sentence.
    They are 3.63 times more likely to commit suicide.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Be very careful in the terms you use with percentages. As others have said, the OP shouldn't really use a percentage in her example, but if she does use a percentage, then 'as likely' does not mean the same as 'more likely'. This may seem contrary to the advice in the thread The Newt links to, but that thread doesn't refer to percentages. Things become even trickier when your starting point is a probability, which may itself be expressed as a percentage.

    Suppose Appleby, Barrow and Cockermouth are three towns, each with 10,000 inhabitants. In Appleby, 5,000 people have a car.
    If you say people in Barrow are 10% more likely to have a car than people in Appleby, this means 5.500 people in Barrow have a car.
    If you say people in Cockermouth are 10% as likely to have a car than people in Appleby, this means that only 500 people have a car.

    The likelihood of people in Appleby, Barrow and Cockermouth having cars can be expressed as percentages:
    In Appleby, 50% of people have a car.
    In Barrow, 55% of people have a car.
    In Cockermouth, 5% of people have a car.​
    Percentage values like these are often compared (in an opinion poll, for example), and here you need to be very careful not to mislead or make completely wrong statements.

    You can say that people in Barrow are 50 percentage points more likely to have a car than people in Cockermouth, but you cannot say they are 50% more likely to have a car (they are 1000% more likely to have a car).

    In general, I recommend using 'more' and a percentage value only when the difference is fairly small; up to 100% is fine but much beyond this and it starts becoming difficult for people to understand.
    For bigger increases, such as the OP's example, use a numerical multiplier. Just to confuse matters, as soon as you use a numerical multiplier the distinction between 'as' and ''more' becomes blurred, and for clarity I recommend only using as, so the OP's 363% more likely (if 'more' was correct in the first place) becomes 4.63 times as likely. If she meant 363% as likely then this becomes 3.63 times as likely.
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    Be very careful in the terms you use with percentages. As others have said, the OP shouldn't really use a percentage in her example, but if she does use a percentage, then 'as likely' does not mean the same as 'more likely'. This may seem contrary to the advice in the thread The Newt links to, but that thread doesn't refer to percentages. Things become even trickier when your starting point is a probability, which may itself be expressed as a percentage.

    Suppose Appleby, Barrow and Cockermouth are three towns, each with 10,000 inhabitants. In Appleby, 5,000 people have a car.
    If you say people in Barrow are 10% more likely to have a car than people in Appleby, this means 5.500 people in Barrow have a car.
    If you say people in Cockermouth are 10% as likely to have a car than people in Appleby, this means that only 500 people have a car.

    The likelihood of people in Appleby, Barrow and Cockermouth having cars can be expressed as percentages:
    In Appleby, 50% of people have a car.
    In Barrow, 55% of people have a car.
    In Cockermouth, 5% of people have a car.​
    Percentage values like these are often compared (in an opinion poll, for example), and here you need to be very careful not to mislead or make completely wrong statements.

    You can say that people in Barrow are 50 percentage points more likely to have a car than people in Cockermouth, but you cannot say they are 50% more likely to have a car (they are 1000% more likely to have a car).

    In general, I recommend using 'more' and a percentage value only when the difference is fairly small; up to 100% is fine but much beyond this and it starts becoming difficult for people to understand.
    For bigger increases, such as the OP's example, use a numerical multiplier. Just to confuse matters, as soon as you use a numerical multiplier the distinction between 'as' and ''more' becomes blurred, and for clarity I recommend only using as, so the OP's 363% more likely (if 'more' was correct in the first place) becomes 4.63 times as likely. If she meant 363% as likely then this becomes 3.63 times as likely.
    :thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:
     

    AidaGlass

    Senior Member
    Persian-Iran
    Be very careful in the terms you use with percentages. As others have said, the OP shouldn't really use a percentage in her example, but if she does use a percentage, then 'as likely' does not mean the same as 'more likely'. This may seem contrary to the advice in the thread The Newt links to, but that thread doesn't refer to percentages. Things become even trickier when your starting point is a probability, which may itself be expressed as a percentage.

    Suppose Appleby, Barrow and Cockermouth are three towns, each with 10,000 inhabitants. In Appleby, 5,000 people have a car.
    If you say people in Barrow are 10% more likely to have a car than people in Appleby, this means 5.500 people in Barrow have a car.
    If you say people in Cockermouth are 10% as likely to have a car than people in Appleby, this means that only 500 people have a car.

    The likelihood of people in Appleby, Barrow and Cockermouth having cars can be expressed as percentages:
    In Appleby, 50% of people have a car.
    In Barrow, 55% of people have a car.
    In Cockermouth, 5% of people have a car.Percentage values like these are often compared (in an opinion poll, for example), and here you need to be very careful not to mislead or make completely wrong statements.

    You can say that people in Barrow are 50 percentage points more likely to have a car than people in Cockermouth, but you cannot say they are 50% more likely to have a car (they are 1000% more likely to have a car).

    In general, I recommend using 'more' and a percentage value only when the difference is fairly small; up to 100% is fine but much beyond this and it starts becoming difficult for people to understand.
    For bigger increases, such as the OP's example, use a numerical multiplier. Just to confuse matters, as soon as you use a numerical multiplier the distinction between 'as' and ''more' becomes blurred, and for clarity I recommend only using as, so the OP's 363% more likely (if 'more' was correct in the first place) becomes 4.63 times as likely. If she meant 363% as likely then this becomes 3.63 times as likely.
    Thanks for your complete explanation:thumbsup:
     
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