more mad or madder

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JungKim

Senior Member
Korean
(1) No one is more mad than I am.
(2) No one is madder than I am.

Which do you find more natural and idiomatic?
 
  • Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Mad has two basic meanings: angry and insane. I wouldn't expect to hear "more mad" in the sense of angry, but I would not be surprised to hear it in the sense of insane (which is how Malvolio uses it in Twelfth Night).
     

    Lavernock

    Senior Member
    wales English
    Madder would be more usual. Single syllable adjectives (but not good or bad) usually take "er" for the comparative form. (cold, colder) Adjectives with two or more syllables usually take the "more" form, except bisyllables ending in "y". e.g. pretty, ugly, heavy (prettier, uglier, heavier). Be careful with adverbs like "slowly". ( more slowly.)
     

    JungKim

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Mad has two basic meanings: angry and insane. I wouldn't expect to hear "more mad" in the sense of angry, but I would not be surprised to hear it in the sense of insane (which is how Malvolio uses it in Twelfth Night).
    Aside from the grammaticality, who in their right mind would say "No one is more crazy than I am."?? (No pun intended.)
    When 'mad' is used, doesn't the context play a role in determining whether it means 'angry' or 'insane'??

    On a side note, I thought Britons usually use 'mad' to mean 'insane' whereas Americans 'angry'. Seeing as you're an American, I'm sort of shocked that you're more likely to interpret 'mad' in (1) to mean 'insane' than 'angry'. :)
     
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