more of the overall

_Akara_

Member
Spanish
Hi,

I would like to know the meaning of this sentence:

Increases in A exports account for more of the overall increase in exports.

Does it mean that the increase in A exports represents more than, say, 50% of the total increase in exports? that mainly thanks to that increase in A exports, overall exports go up?

Thanks in advance!
 
  • tamoka

    Member
    Romanian
    hey,

    are you sure it`s "more" and not "most"? or maybe "more than 50%"? because then it would mean that the increase in A exports represent most of the total increase in exports, like you said.
     

    Frenko

    Senior Member
    Italy, Italian
    The increase in A export exceeds the overall increase (e.g. overall increase=10, A increase=11). Obviously that is only possible if A isn't the sole exported product.

    f :)

    edit:
    Sorry tamoka we cross-posted :)
     
    Last edited:

    tamoka

    Member
    Romanian
    :) haha that`s ok
    i don`t think it says that either though, frenko. because if it did, the sentence would say "accounts for more than" not "more of", right?
    i still think the context is necessary
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    There's no point in guessing, because it's simply ambiguous: "more" is used with no explanation of this word of comparison. Akara, you need to give us more context, especially the sentences immediately preceding the one you quoted. (Per the forum rules, you may quote as many as four sentences.) You should also tell us the source and, if it's online, include a link.
     

    Frenko

    Senior Member
    Italy, Italian
    :) haha that`s ok
    i don`t think it says that either though, frenko. because if it did, the sentence would say "accounts for more than" not "more of", right?
    i still think the context is necessary
    You're absolutely right. Trying to make sense of one thing I overlooked the other :p

    But, in this case I don't understand what you meant in your previous post. Can you make a numeric example? :confused:

    edit:
    Got it. More than B... yeah, that's the only option I can see
     
    Last edited:

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    This incomplete comparison structure is one of my pet peeves. One of the soft drink companies has a slogan which I like to play "complete the sentence" with:
    Diet X tastes more like real X (than it tastes like moose urine, but not by much). ;)
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Please give us more context -- otherwise, it's just a guessing game. You may quote up to three additional sentences or link to an online source.
     

    tamoka

    Member
    Romanian
    hey,

    so yeah, it`s a comparison between processed and non-processed. explains the "more" and it makes sense :D the non-processed ones represent more than the processed ones.
    mystery solved! yay :)
     
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