more than thought

0901chris

Member
korean
"We complain of the shortness of time, but have more than thought"

I know what that means but have trouble understanding the usage of "more than thought". I think it basically means "more than we think". Likewise, why not just use the latter?
Can you tell me the difference between the two phrases? And also I want to get the hang of the precise sense of the former. Explanation in detail with a few example sentences will be very much appreciated. :)
 
  • MuttQuad

    Senior Member
    English - AmE
    Without additional context, it appears that the meaning you give is correct. It's an alternative way of saying "more than is thought," i.e. generally thought, or thought by most people.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    "We complain of the shortness of time, but have more than thought.[1]" = "We complain of the shortness of time, but we have more time than everyone thought we had."

    [1] The usual way to say this is: "We complain of the shortness of time, but have more than we thought.
     
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