more twinkle then eye

Yujan Chou

Senior Member
Chinese-China
I was reading an article in memory of the late writer Adrian Anthony "A. A." Gill. The author writes:

"Adrian was also an extraordinarily attractive man. He could have sprung from the novels of Georgette Heyer – all louche regency buck – and more twinkle then eye."

I have difficulty understanding the part of "more twinkle then eye." Can someone explain it for me?
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    We speak of someone having a twinkle in their eye – the eye can be thought of as substance, something real, while the twinkle is nothing more than a glint of light that comes and goes in an instant. So this person is more sparkle than substance.

    As for the phrase you have, it should be "more twinkle than eye."
     

    8thnote

    Senior Member
    English-Southern US
    I was reading an article in memory of the late writer Adrian Anthony "A. A." Gill. The author writes:

    "Adrian was also an extraordinarily attractive man. He could have sprung from the novels of Georgette Heyer – all louche regency buck – and more twinkle then eye."

    I have difficulty understanding the part of "more twinkle then eye." Can someone explain it for me?
    When someone is said to have "a twinkle in their eye" it usually means that they are very charming or alluring. When the author says "more twinkle than eye" it likely means that the alluring charm is very superficial.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top