Moreover - transitional word

yashar

Senior Member
Persian
Hello

I am trying to use a transitional word to describe something. However, I do not know how to pick an appropriate transitional word for what I am trying to say.
Here is the template.

There are facts A and B.
In addition to the fact A, we also have to pay attention to the fact B.

Are there better transitional words to use instead of in addition to?

Thank You
 
  • Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    If we consider the two facts as sentences, the one intensifying the other, then moreover is one of several possibilities.

    Consider two facts:

    a. the cat is on the mat.
    b. the cat is being sick on the mat.

    One might well say: the cat is on the mat; moreover the cat is being sick on the mat.

    There are other possibilities like furthermore, what is more,
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Thank You
    In this case, facts A and B are two different facts which are not related to each other.
    Then say and, or also. There are several other suitable conjunctions.

    If they aren't related, why did you say that one also had to pay attention to B? This suggests a relation. While I'm very fond of the cat, he is being sick on the mat. Two sentences, not apparently related - I'm not fond of him because he is being sick - but we might use a concessive to link them.

    This whole exercise is made difficult by the fact that we aren't given sentences to play with. We can't easily say much about Fact A and Fact B, but most native speakers would come up with plenty of helpful suggestions if you gave them sentences to link.
     
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    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    If the second fact might lead to different conclusions than the first fact, you can use "on the other hand": The chair I'm thinking of buying is very expensive. On the other hand, it's sturdy and of excellent quality and will last longer than a cheaper chair.

    It's hard to comment without knowing the nature of the facts you have in mind.

    Sometimes, just "and" will do: I think I'll break for lunch now. I've just finished one stage of my project and am about to start another, so it's a good time. And, I'm hungry.
     

    yashar

    Senior Member
    Persian
    So these facts have no relationship, but they have to considered at the same time?
    Yes, they have to be considered at the same time.
    Those facts are two scientific facts. Fact A is that there are several equations to describe the evolution of a system. However, fact B is related to the fact that when we have chosen a specific equation, we have to consider different parameters.
    In summary fact A = I have several equivalent equation to describe something.
    fact B = for a given equation, I have several regime of parameters which I can choose.
     
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