morgane

  • Aupick

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    Hello Moni,

    Are you thinking of 'morgane'? This is a slang word meaning 'madly in love' made popular by Renaud in his song 'Morgane de toi'. It has an 'e' even in the masculine. Other than that, I'm stumped.
     

    aurayfrance

    Senior Member
    France, French, English and Spanish
    Moni said:
    hi people,

    i couldn't find this word anywhere, maybe you will know what does "morgan" mean (it's a french word of course:))

    thanks for help

    I am not sure it's French (or slang perhaps?). I have just checked in my Grand Robert, this word doesn't appear. We have "morganatique" that refers to a prince's wife of lower condition who has not all the rights of a noble spouse.
     

    aurayfrance

    Senior Member
    France, French, English and Spanish
    Aupick said:
    Hello Moni,

    Are you thinking of 'morgane'? This is a slang word meaning 'madly in love' made popular by Renaud in his song 'Morgane de toi'. It has an 'e' even in the masculine. Other than that, I'm stumped.

    You're right but, after a Google search, it seems this word is used only in the Renaud's song.
     

    Moni

    New Member
    well guys this word is used not only in renaud's songs but also in slai's songs
    (the title of the song is 'amoureux de vous', unfortunately i've just found that i couldn't put here the link for you to see it...:confused:)

    thanks for help:)
     

    Amityville

    Senior Member
    English UK
    aurayfrance said:
    I am not sure it's French (or slang perhaps?). I have just checked in my Grand Robert, this word doesn't appear. We have "morganatique" that refers to a prince's wife of lower condition who has not all the rights of a noble spouse.

    Morganatic exists in English too, with the same meaning.

    Why did Renaud invent the other word - was it his lover's name, was it a morganatic relationship, was he thinking of Morgan le Fey - probably we will never know but it is poetic and Renaud-like, anyway.
     

    Aupick

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    Amityville said:
    Morganatic exists in English too, with the same meaning.

    Why did Renaud invent the other word - was it his lover's name, was it a morganatic relationship, was he thinking of Morgan le Fey - probably we will never know but it is poetic and Renaud-like, anyway.
    Actually he didn't so much invent the word as resurrect it, with his own little variation. Here's what I found in my Dictionnaire de l'argot français et de ses origines (Jean-Paul Colin, Larousse, 1990):
    morgané, e ou morgane adj. Épris de : Tu sais ma môme que j'suis morgane de toi (Renaud).
    Étym. participe passé de morganer. 1910 [Esnault]. Le chanteur Renaud a relancé ce mot en 1983, en supprimant le phonème [e] en finale.

    morganer v.t. 1. Mordre : Le voyou ne cria pas. Mais tout juste. Il n'eut que le temps de se morganer les lèvres (Le Breton) - 2. Manger : Personne envisageait de se serrer un peu à table pour qu'il puisse morganer une petite part du gâteau (Simonin) - 3. Apercevoir - 4. Dénoncer.
    Étym. mot d'origine romane (cf. arg. piémontais murcar, manger, et esp. murguir, id.)

    There! More than you ever wanted to know
     

    Amityville

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Thankyou, Aupick, and not at all, I am interested in things like that. I bet he was thinking of misty Arthurian legends too though and other nuances.
     

    Aupick

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    Amityville said:
    Thankyou, Aupick, and not at all, I am interested in things like that. I bet he was thinking of misty Arthurian legends too though and other nuances.
    I bet he was, too. He wrote that song in his later period when he was softening up a bit. Of course it's his daughter he's singing to, and she was about three years old at the time. :)
     

    Amityville

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Oh, I didn't know that - some of the nuances would be inappropriate, then. Perhaps it's more in the style of the one about Mitterand's dog.
     
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