(morphology) Student: a simple or complex word?

< Previous | Next >

KingdomCome

Member
Spanish-Mexico
Hello everyone. A simple word has only 1 free form. A complex word has at least 1 bound form.

So is 'student' a simple word (it cannot be divided into smaller forms) or is it a complex word with the base 'stud-' and '-ent' as a suffix ? Thanks.
 
  • JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Is a verb ending the same as a suffix in your analytical system? If it was a verb ending in its original language, does it remain so when moved to a new language (-ent is an Anglicized form of a Latin verb ending).
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Based on your definition, student is a simple word. Unless you want to suggest that stud- is a form of study? That would be difficult to argue.

    You might find the OED etymology entry of interest: they also suggest that the word was borrowed whole into English.
    In α. forms either (i) aphetic < estudiant n. (although this is first attested slightly later),or (ii) < Anglo-Norman and Middle French estudiant, estudient estudiant n.; the loss of the initial vowel may result from association with study v.(beside estudy v.). Compare studient adj.In β. forms (iii) < post-classical Latin student-, studens person engaged in study (frequently from 1231 in British sources; also in continental sources), (perhaps) member of the foundation of Christ Church, Oxford (1565 in a British source), earlier (in plural) denoting fanatical members of a sect (4th cent.), use as noun of classical Latin student- , studēns , present participle of studēre to apply oneself, study (see study n.).
     

    SevenDays

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Hello everyone. A simple word has only 1 free form. A complex word has at least 1 bound form.

    So is 'student' a simple word (it cannot be divided into smaller forms) or is it a complex word with the base 'stud-' and '-ent' as a suffix ? Thanks.
    stud-ent
    stud-i-ous
    stud-y
    Yes, I think stud- is the base/root morpheme (from Latin, "devote oneself to"), and the others are bound morphemes
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top