1. stcrocefirenze Senior Member

    3cantos,madrid
    español castellano, españa
    is there any equivalent for the expression "mosca cojonera"?. i mean someone who is boring, persistent and annoying, all of that at the same time?
     
  2. Mate

    Mate Senior Member

    Argentina
    Castellano - Argentina
    ¿Como te suena pain? Como en she's such a pain!
     
  3. stcrocefirenze Senior Member

    3cantos,madrid
    español castellano, españa
    it can work!, thanks
     
  4. anitadarling New Member

    spanish
    Hola. Alguien podria decirme una expresion en ingles que equivalga a "ser una mosca cojonera" Gracias
     
  5. Onager Senior Member

    English, Tagalog
    Te sirve "a pain the neck"?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 1, 2009
  6. mnewcomb71 Senior Member

    Detroit, MI
    USA - English
    I like "pita" or "Major Pita"

    (P)ain
    (I)n
    (T)he
    (A)ss
     
  7. Dlyons

    Dlyons Senior Member

    Dublin
    English - Ireland

    Yes, that's nice, but maybe the poster needs something more widely used?

    How about "pest", which fits fairly well with "mosca" ?
     
  8. mnewcomb71 Senior Member

    Detroit, MI
    USA - English
    Poster? What poster?

    I get it now...poster as in the one who posted and not poster as in something stuck on a wall...

    Wow...I need to learn me some English I guess.
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2009
  9. Transatellite Senior Member

    Spain Spanish
    Hi,
    ive I've been looking for an equivalent to this expression too. I knew the PITA thing and just pain, but they are not the same,
    mosca cojonera has playful meaning, someone that annoys persistently, a bit playfully and the expression is not as negative as Pain in the Arse...
    Any English native speaker to share their ideas?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 22, 2009
  10. timboctou

    timboctou Senior Member

    el norte de Inglaterra
    English/Inglés
    I don't really know what cojonera means but if I understand it is when a child? is making a nuisance of themselves.

    In this situation you could use something like "little devil" or "little imp" - to describe when they are being naughty/mischievous.
     
  11. Transatellite Senior Member

    Spain Spanish
    cojonera, is related to "cojones" is the vulgar word for "balls" so literally means like being a fly that sticks to the balls... really annoying as you can see... but no as much as a pain in the arse/neck, and I tend to think your latest contribution is a bit too childish...ah well im not sure...
     
  12. stcrocefirenze Senior Member

    3cantos,madrid
    español castellano, españa
    I have this feeling that despite there might be lost of idioms even for this, the sake of politically correct thing, and the formal approach to english, prevent people to be able to help with such thing; experience tells that sometimes after very, very long browsings of the urbandictionnary or the like, the answers appear, but not always of course;
    now I know why Placido Domingo curses in Italian...
     
  13. timboctou

    timboctou Senior Member

    el norte de Inglaterra
    English/Inglés
    How about one of these:-
    "A bloody nuisance" or "A ball ache"
    The only problem is that the translator comes up with "un fastidio sangriento" and "un dolor de la bola / un dolor de pelota" for these so I'm not sure if they can be used in this context.
     
  14. chicoinglés Senior Member

    UK
    English - UK
    ¿Qué tal 'to be a pain in the neck'? De vez en cuando me dice eso de 'ser una mosca cojonera' mi novia, así que ya sé cómo se siente uno después de que se lo hayan espetado...jaja

    En fin, espero que te sirva de algo :)

    Saludos,

    Jordan
     
  15. The Prof

    The Prof Senior Member

    I know it's already been suggested, but I think 'a pain in the neck' works well, in BE anyway.
    It's not too strong, but not childish, and can even be moderated more if wished, to 'a bit of a pain in the neck'!
     
  16. chicoinglés Senior Member

    UK
    English - UK
    My thoughts precisely, The Prof.
     
  17. stcrocefirenze Senior Member

    3cantos,madrid
    español castellano, españa
    Hi, it seems to me that some nuances are lost in translation:
    mosca cojonera is not exactly a pain in the neck; a pain in the neck is alguien que te está jodiendo, but mosca cojonera is more weak not as strong, its about somedy in the verge of being annoying, but not a pain definitely, besides that, there is kind of an implicit play on words, beacuse al ser cojonera la mosca, te está tocando los cojones, what it is not exacty to hurt you, or pain you, but more annoying or dismantling your nerve, so whatever...
     
  18. Ausias

    Ausias New Member

    London UK
    Catalan-Valencia Castillian-Spanish
    Hi, stcrocefirenze and everybody, I suggest GADFLY, tábano in english. Figuratively it means an annoying person, someone who provokes other into action by criticism.

    Noam Chomsky is a gadfly in current US policy.
    Noam Chomsky es la mosca cojonera de la política de USA.

    I reckon it isn't exactly te same, but it fits pretty well.
    Perhaps mosca cojonera is more a colloquial expression, while gadfly remains more formal...
     
  19. Sunshine on Leith Senior Member

    Edinburgh
    Spain's Spanish
    Given that cojones has found its way in the English language anyway, how about 'he's getting on my cojones' or 'he's a pain in the cojones' (being a pain is not strong at all, in my opinion)
     

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