most of OR majority of

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ntcl

Senior Member
portuguese

In the case of the sentence below, which one is the best “most of “ or “majority of” . Thank you for your help in advance.

I am sorry I did not get to see you in Paris. I hope my next time in the city I won’t fell guilty for not going to most of museums and tourist places and won’t fell so worn-out in the end of the day for a dinner with you and Christian.

OR

I am sorry I did not get to see you in Paris. I hope my next time in the city I won’t fell guilty for not going to the majority of museums and tourist places and won’t fell so worn-out in the end of the day for a dinner with you and Christian.
 
  • ntcl

    Senior Member
    portuguese
    Hi bibliolept,

    Because it was my first time in the city i could not resist to do too much but i that I hope next time I won't fell obligated to do it all and will have the energy to have dinner with them.
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    I'd suggest:
    I am sorry I did not get to see you in Paris. I hope that my next time in the city I won’t feel guilty for
    not going mostly to museums and tourist spots and won’t feel too worn-out at the end of the day for a dinner with you and Christian.
     

    prankstare

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    I'm sorry, but is there any case in which "majority of" would fit? If there is, fill me up.

    I don't think "majority of" is correct English (is it?).
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Bibliolept, does majoity of your time sound equally good as most of your time please?

    Tom
     

    Waylink

    Senior Member
    English (British)
    In general, "most" is more suitable than "majority of". "most" is simpler, less pretentious, and generally used with the same meaning as "majority of".

    "most" also has greater utility in that you can use it with mass (uncountable) nouns in situations where "majority of" cannot be used.

    -- Most cats prefer Waylink Catfood. :tick:
    -- The majority of cats prefer Waylink Catfood. :tick:

    -- Most poverty in Zimbabwe is due to poor governance. :tick:
    -- Most of the poverty in Zimbabwe is due to poor governance. :tick:
    -- The majority of the poverty in Zimbabwe is due to poor governance. :cross:

    Note also that "a majority of" generally does NOT mean "most".

    -- 200 MPs voted. 120 voted 'Yes' and 80 voted 'No'.
    -- The majority of MPs (120) voted 'Yes'.
    -- They had a majority of 40. ( = the difference between Yes votes and No votes)
     

    prankstare

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    In general, "most" is more suitable than "majority of". "most" is simpler, less pretentious, and generally used with the same meaning as "majority of".

    "most" also has greater utility in that you can use it with mass (uncountable) nouns in situations where "majority of" cannot be used.

    -- Most cats prefer Waylink Catfood. :tick:
    -- The majority of cats prefer Waylink Catfood. :tick:

    -- Most poverty in Zimbabwe is due to poor governance. :tick:
    -- Most of the poverty in Zimbabwe is due to poor governance. :tick:
    -- The majority of the poverty in Zimbabwe is due to poor governance. :cross:

    Note also that "a majority of" generally does NOT mean "most".

    -- 200 MPs voted. 120 voted 'Yes' and 80 voted 'No'.
    -- The majority of MPs (120) voted 'Yes'.
    -- They had a majority of 40. ( = the difference between Yes votes and No votes)

    Hum, interesting.

    I was actually thinking about a sample sentence using 'majority of'. Can you check if it works or not please?

    "I wouldn't spend the majority of a lifetime just sitting around at home doing nothing."


    note: I know my sentence was kinda cheesy and there must be other minor grammar mistakes; please let me know if you encounter any.
     

    Waylink

    Senior Member
    English (British)
    "I wouldn't spend the majority of a lifetime just sitting around at home doing nothing."
    I think that this would be better phrased as:

    -- "I wouldn't spend most of my life just sitting around at home doing nothing." :tick:

    -- I spent 40 years in Africa, most of them in Tanzania. :tick:

    -- I spent 40 years in Africa, the majority of them in Tanzania. :tick: (but not better than the version with most)

    I have expressed my opinion that in general use, "most" is a better choice than "the majority of" and that "the majority of" is used with things that are countable such as people, days, years, cars, patients. I suggested that it does not generally sound right to use "the majority of" when referring to mass (uncountable) nouns.

    In my view the following should NOT use "majority of":

    -- The majority of illness (uncountable) is due to unhealthy diet and lack of exercise. :cross:
    -- Most illness is due to unhealthy diet and lack of exercise. :tick:

    -- The majority of milk is pasteurised before being sold in shops. : cross :
    -- Most milk is pasteurised before being sold in shops. : tick :

    -- The majority of his optimism was due to alcohol consumption. :cross:
    -- Most of his optimism was due to alcohol consumption. :tick:


    Another reason why I prefer "most" rather than "majority of" in most (!) cases is that "most" is easier for English learners because they do not have to bother figuring out the correct article a/the.

    Your example might be a bit borderline because it is implicit that the "lifetime" is measured in countable units (years).
    "I wouldn't spend the majority of a lifetime just sitting around at home doing nothing."
    It would be good to hear other opinions about that! It might be just my personal taste. I checked in dictionary but although EVERY EXAMPLE given was with a countable noun, it did not actually specify this as a "rule" - it was silent on that aspect.
     
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