Most of them went for tuition, but not for me (?)

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Aaron080

Member
Chinese
Most of them went for tuition, but not for me (?)

I want to said that most of them went to tuition, but I didn't go. Is the sentence correct? or sounds odd?
 
  • Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    What are the "them" that you are discussing here? If this is about money, money (as a general concept) is not countable, though its specific units (yuan, dollars, euros, etc.) are. Uncountable nouns have no plural form. Since "them" is a plural pronoun, it cannot be used with uncountable nouns.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Your sentence says
    They went for tuition, but they didn't go for you.
    (I assume you meant "They went to have a lesson" - a BrE meaning of tuition.)
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Picking up on Egmont's comment, your sentence could mean the following:

    I receive funds from my parents to live and to study. Most of them went for tuition, but not for me. (The funds went for tuition)


    I think you mean:

    Most of them went for tuition, but not me.

    Most of them went for tuition, but I didn't.
     

    Aaron080

    Member
    Chinese
    haha, i just made a ridiculous mistake.

    so what about in this way:
    Most of my classmates go for tuition, but I didn't. (that means I study by myself)
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    ... Most of my classmates go for tuition, but I didn't. (that means I study by myself)
    Part of the problem in understanding this is that "tuition" means different things in British English (BE) and American English (AE). You are using it in the BE sense, where it means instruction, teaching. In AE, it means the money that is paid to a school for the privilege of being a student there. Perhaps this will also show that context is always important. Without context, we can only guess - and sometimes we guess wrong!
     
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