move along the traffic

jesusguime

Banned
Chinese
There is a policeman blowing his whistle to move along the traffic.


Hi,
I wonder if I can say "conduct or direct the traffic" instead of "move along ..." in the above without making a change in meaning. Thanks in advance for your comments.
 
  • Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    "move along the traffic" is not natural-sounding, Jesus. We would normally say "There is a policeman blowing his whistle to move the traffic along". As a general rule, you keep the action (move) close to the thing it's describing (the traffic).

    I agree with PB that "direct the traffic" would be fine. "Conduct" the traffic wouldn't.
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    What does 'along' mean in that?

    Traffic Cop: Stop. Stop. Stop! All right, didn't you see that traffic light?
    Karen: You've got to excuse him, sir. You see, he just came to life and he doesn't know much about such things.
    Traffic Cop: Oh, well, okay, if he just came to life. [Cop blows whistle] Move along! That silly snowman. Once they come to life they don't know nothing. Come to life? [Soft whistling]
    Frosty the snowman
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    It means (move) forward, or (move) in that direction. It’s a very common phrasing and I understand the whole thing as “keep moving”. Don’t stop here.
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    It means (move) forward, or (move) in that direction. It’s a very common phrasing and I understand the whole thing as “keep moving”. Don’t stop here.
    Can 'along' be omitted without changing the meaning?
    Is that this meaning of 'along':
    continuing over the length of some specified thing
    ?
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    It could be omited but it would sound very rude.

    I have given you two glosses which are better than your latest suggestion, Re-read my first answer. Really it’s not about a distance it’s about a direction in this case.
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    It could be omited but it would sound very rude.

    I have given you two glosses which are better than your latest suggestion, Re-read my first answer. Really it’s not about a distance it’s about a direction in this case.
    Many thanks.
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    "Move" by itself means "change to a different location", for example, if where someone is creates an inconvenience for someone else.

    "Move along" means "continue moving" / "don't stop", probably in an effort to keep traffic moving.
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    "Move" by itself means "change to a different location", for example, if where someone is creates an inconvenience for someone else.

    "Move along" means "continue moving" / "don't stop", probably in an effort to keep traffic moving.
    If they want to start moving now not that they were moving, can't 'along' be used?
     
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