Move Around

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namlan

Banned
Vietnam
- Have you ever moved forth and back on a wheelchair?
- I think " ..........moved around..............?" is better, right?

Thanks a lot!

NamLan
 
  • Blues Piano Man

    Senior Member
    USA English
    - Have you ever moved forth and back on a wheelchair?
    - I think " ..........moved around..............?" is better, right?

    Thanks a lot!

    NamLan
    Hi namlan,
    The common English phrase is "back and forth."

    It does not mean the same as "move around."

    "Back and forth" indicates a repetitive motion from one point to another and back.

    It probably originally meant a movement forward and backward, but now it's more general. It could be side to side, such as turning your head left and right.

    By the way, it does not apply to up and down. I think it's always in the horizontal direction.
     

    Blues Piano Man

    Senior Member
    USA English
    It could refer to up and down.

    E.g. The shuttle travelled back and forth between Earth and the space station.
    Good example, nzfauna!

    It looks like "back and forth" works in any direction if you specify the path using "between location A and location B."

    I think when you say "back and forth" without specifying the end locations, it implies horizontal movement. Does that sound right?

    Blues :)
     

    Elwintee

    Senior Member
    England English
    When I saw the first post my initial impression was of a person fidgeting on a wheelchair, not of the wheelchair moving.
    Sorry to be pernickety, but don't we sit in a wheelchair, not on it? There was a post recently about sitting in/on stools, chairs, sofas etc. The consensus seemed to be that we sit 'in' a chair that has arms.
     

    Blues Piano Man

    Senior Member
    USA English
    When I saw the first post my initial impression was of a person fidgeting on a wheelchair, not of the wheelchair moving.
    And I can see why. :) I guess I just took "on" (in "on a wheelchair") to be a typo for "in." You're right. If "on" is correct, that means the person was moving, not the wheelchair.

    Blues
     
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