move your wrist around / limber up your wrist

ridgemao

Senior Member
Chinese - Mandarin
Hello:

1. Gently move your wrist around to check for pain...If you notice a sharp pain in your wrist...
2. Learn to limber up your wrist so you don't get injuries.

I think both "move your wrist around" and "limber up your wrist" mean the same hand movement, but "limber up" is specific to sport exercise.


Am I correct? Thank you.

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Context 1:
How to Tell If You Sprained Your Wrist golfsmith.com
Gently move your wrist around to check for pain, swelling and tenderness. If you notice a sharp pain in your wrist, try not to bend it until...

Context 2:
Kotegaeshi Undo, an Aikido exercise ehow.com
The stretches are important for several reasons. Number one, to learn to limber up your wrist so you don't get injuries.
 
  • SReynolds

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Yes, limber up has an implied sports context associated with it. It's part of what you do when you're warming up: you do certain exercises to make your muscles and your joints more flexible in order to prepare them for more intensive physical work.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    I've only ever seen "limber up" used intransitively.

    It sounds a bit odd to me to use it for specific parts of the body. :(
     

    SReynolds

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Oh, yes, there's that. I hadn't actually read the sentence, but on second thought, limber up should definitely be intransitive. In a more metaphorical sense (to make something more flexible or loose), however, at least one dictionary thinks it can be used transitively.
     
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