Mr Bennet verbat sich jede Beschreibung von weiblichem Putz.

AnnaJDT

Senior Member
Romanian
Hello everyone,
I have a new challenge for you:
"Mr Bennet verbat sich jede Beschreibung von weiblichem Putz."
"Mr Bennet refused to tolerate every description of ...?"
weiblichem Putz = feminine plaster - this doesn't make sense. There must be a meaning not captured in the dictionary, maybe an archaic one?

Thank you!
 
  • wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    The original text in Jane Austen reads: 'Mr. Bennet protested against any description of finery.'

    Thus 'weiblichem Putz' represents the one word 'finery'.
    The description he interrupted in this case was that of 'the lace on Mrs. Hurst's gown'.
     
    Last edited:

    Dan2

    Senior Member
    US
    English (US)
    Putz is "Schmuck".
    Yes, in Amer Eng too...:)
    There's also a verb "putzen" in the sense of "to decorate" but I only use it when talking about setting up a Christmas tree and decorating it.
    But, for ex., Zähne/Nase/Fenster putzen is very common, right? Or did you mean "There's also a (common) verb "putzen" but in the sense of "to decorate" I only use it when talking about setting up a Christmas tree and decorating it."?
     

    manfy

    Senior Member
    German - Austria
    Or did you mean "There's also a (common) verb "putzen" but in the sense of "to decorate" I only use it when talking about setting up a Christmas tree and decorating it."?
    Yes, it is most often used in the form of "sich herausputzen", e.g.
    "Sieh an! Deine Schwester hat sich heute Abend ja ganz besonders herausgeputzt!"

    Normally it is used as a flattering, yet honest, expression for a person who shows up in a surprisingly beautiful or festive style, something that is different from his/her everyday style.
    However, it can also be uttered with a sarcastic undertone, if one is seriously overdressed or if makeup, jewelry, general appearance does go in the general direction of a fully-fledged christmas tree... ;) (but for that I might prefer the word "aufgeputzt")
     
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