Mr., Ms., etc. for Face-to-Face Introduction

HSS

Senior Member
Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
(an airport counter clerk has taken a man to Left Luggage to help him find his bag)
"This man here ... sorry, what's your name?"
"Mr. Hartley"
"Mr. Hartley here has lost his bag"
(From Air Babylon by Imogen Edwards-Jones and Anonymous)
Would you identify yourself using Mr., Ms., Mrs. etc. when you are in the clear, and people can tell your gender easily? My Australian boss once told me not to add Mr. before my family name when introducing myself. But my co-workers did use Mr. Ms. etc. a lot introducing themselves when I worked in the U.S. (Yes, in letters and emails, where you can't tell genders by viewing, especially for names so foreign, you would very much likely use Mr., Ms. etc.)
 
  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Hello Hiro. I would introduce myself as Mr.P___ if I wanted to be addressed as Mr.P___ and not by my first name ~ I suppose this wouldn't be unusual in a businessy setting:)
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    (an airport counter clerk has taken a man to Left Luggage to help him find his bag)
    "This man here ... sorry, what's your name?"
    "Mr. Hartley"
    "Mr. Hartley here has lost his bag"
    (From Air Babylon by Imogen Edwards-Jones and Anonymous)
    ...
    In that context I think Mr Hartley's reply is very strange. Not incorrect, just very strange and perhaps characteristic of an older generation than mine.
     

    Nunty

    Modified
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    In that context I think Mr Hartley's reply is very strange. Not incorrect, just very strange and perhaps characteristic of an older generation than mine.
    Does that mean that you would reply "Hartley" or "Michael Hartley" (assuming you were Mr. Michael Hartley)?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    In that context I think Mr Hartley's reply is very strange. Not incorrect, just very strange and perhaps characteristic of an older generation than mine.
    Me too.
    Does that mean that you would reply "Hartley" or "Michael Hartley" (assuming you were Mr. Michael Hartley)?
    Yes. Probably, in that context, just "Hartley".
     

    Nunty

    Modified
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    Sorry for persisting, but I find this fascinating and very useful. Would Michael's wife also just use her surname in that situation?
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I must slow down my reading... at a glance, I thought it was the airport clerk calling him Mr. Hartley -- which he does after Mr. Hartley volunteers his name. But it is odd, I agree. If someone is trying to find my bag, I would give them my full name -- Michael Harley, without the Mr.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Sorry for persisting, but I find this fascinating and very useful. Would Michael's wife also just use her surname in that situation?
    In an airport situation, I would give my full name because that's what people trying to help you are going to look for on any kind of manifest, or even on the business card you tucked into your luggage: Michael Harley, Marion Hartley.

    Edit: Reading Loob's answer, I would like to clarify because not all wives take their husbands' names. I would recommend giving them whatever name you've used to book your airline ticket... or whatever name they can expect to find on your baggage tag. It's not an "introduction" question for me so much as a hide-and-seek question.
     
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    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Sorry for persisting, but I find this fascinating and very useful. Would Michael's wife also just use her surname in that situation?
    Yes. If I were Loob Hartley, I would probably just say "Hartley" in that context. I might say "Loob Hartley". I would not say "Mrs Hartley".
     

    HSS

    Senior Member
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    (an airport counter clerk has taken a man to Left Luggage to help him find his bag)
    "This man here ... sorry, what's your name?"
    "Mr. Hartley"
    "Mr. Hartley here has lost his bag"​

    This is merely an introduction to a gentleman working at the Left Luggage. Mr. Hartley will show him the stub of his boarding pass so he would know Hartley's full name.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    (an airport counter clerk has taken a man to Left Luggage to help him find his bag)
    "This man here ... sorry, what's your name?"
    "Hartley. Michael Hartley."
    "Mr. Hartley here has lost his bag"
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    (an airport counter clerk has taken a man to Left Luggage to help him find his bag)
    "This man here ... sorry, what's your name?"
    "Hartley. Michael Hartley."
    "Mr. Hartley here has lost his bag"
    I like this better. I see a bit of a BE/AE difference, though, with the use of "This man here..." In AE, to phrase it that way in the presence of the man being discussed could be regarded as not merely less than polite, but as something rapidly approaching open rudeness. I think that in the US one would be more likely to hear either something such as "this customer has lost his bag", or -- and most likely of all -- "this gentleman has lost his bag".
     

    HSS

    Senior Member
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    Further to my original question, I bumped into this dialogue. This recalls the same query: Is this common, is introducing yourself Mr., Miss, Ms., Mrs., Dr., etc. common when you are vis-a-vis with the person?

    (Gogol's father passed away alone in the hospital, and his son has just come to sort out the situation. Waiting in a room, he saw a man entering there)
    Man: Hello
    Gogol: Are you --- were you my father's docter?
    M: No. I'm Mr. Davenport. I'll be taking you downstairs.
    (Mr. Devenport escorts Gogol in an elevator reserved for patients and doctors to the morgue. He is apparently in charge of the room and arranges the release of the bodies)
    ('The Namesake' by Jhumpa Lahiri, retold)
     
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    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Hi again, Hiro

    It's fine in that context. The speaker is stressing the "Mr": what he's saying is "No, I'm not Dr Davenport, I'm Mr Davenport".

    Does that make sense?:)
     

    HSS

    Senior Member
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    I guess, Loob. In the original text, 'Mr.' was not stressed in bold letters, but then stressed parts are not usually bolded in novels.

    Gotcha!:thumbsup:
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Ah ...

    In that case, I'm probably misleading you, Hiro. It may well be that the character was just being officious, in a rather old-fashioned way.
     

    HSS

    Senior Member
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    Mmmm, one or the other I assume. I don't think there is any clue in the book. But I feel inclined to cast a vote for your former suggestion.
     
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    Starfrown

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "This man here..." In AE, to phrase it that way in the presence of the man being discussed could be regarded as not merely less than polite, but as something rapidly approaching open rudeness. I think that in the US one would be more likely to hear either something such as "this customer has lost his bag", or -- and most likely of all -- "this gentleman has lost his bag".
    I agree wholeheartedly. To me, "this man here" just sounds too harsh.
    ----
    To Hiro, I don't think an English speaker can refer to himself as Mr. any more than a Japanese can refer to himself as san. It simply isn't done under normal circumstances.

    Loob has explained your example as an extraordinary circumstance in which it would be acceptable to refer to yourself as Mr. in order to differentiate yourself from a Dr., but such a situation most likely would rarely come up.
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    I agree wholeheartedly. To me, "this man here" just sounds too harsh.
    ----
    To Hiro, I don't think an English speaker can refer to himself as Mr. any more than a Japanese can refer to himself as san. It simply isn't done under normal circumstances.

    Loob has explained your example as an extraordinary circumstance in which it would be acceptable to refer to yourself as Mr. in order to differentiate yourself from a Dr., but such a situation most likely would rarely come up.
    In the olden days [back before you were born] it was very common for people to refer to themselves as Mr Jones, Miss Jones or Mrs Jones.

    This applied to people who had no need to know what the first name was, and who would not be on "first name terms".
     
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    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Primary school teachers in this part of the world still introduce themselves to their class and to parents as Mr this and Miss that. It is how they are referred to in the school when the kids are being polite, which they are, most of the time.

    (The days when surgeons are Mr, not Dr, are still here - but please do not comment further on this thread. Instead, have a look at surgeons are Mr., not Dr. in England?)
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    In general, yes, don't include your own title when introducing yourself. As panj says, an exception is for primary school teachers. But my wife when making a restaurant booking might say she was 'Mrs So-and-so'. So this can still happen in some situations.
     
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