Mr whoever/ Mr whomever

Fictional

Senior Member
India - Hindi
Me again.:)
I came across a sentence in Josh Grisham's The Rainmaker, it says:

I'm a third year law student in Memphis state. I would like to speak to Mr whoever about a job.

From what I have learnt, you have to use 'whomever' instead of whoever when it's preceded by a preposition. Then how come the writer has written ' Mr whoever', shouldn't it be 'Mr whomever'?
 
  • boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    It is not the grammar of the sentence that determines this choice, Fictional. 'Mr Whoever' means 'just anyone - the concerned person' (or at least that's how I understand it here). It could stand in subject or object position - does not matter - it would still be Mr. Whoever, not Mr. Whomever or Mr. Whomsoever. :)
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Thank you! So no matter what the position is, we will always say 'Mr whoever'?
    First of all, the author is John Grisham, not Josh Grisham.

    Secondly, it's a device meaning "somebody" that's a creation of the author. Don't worry about it and don't start "aways" using it.
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    In the sense in which it is used here - yes, I always would.

    What you've been taught is a formula - a very restrictive formula, though one largely correct. This formula does not apply here because this is some figurative sense of 'whoever'. Besides, one can also say 'speak to who' (not 'whom') and thus deviate from the formula in question :D
     

    Fictional

    Senior Member
    India - Hindi
    First of all, the author is John Grisham, not Josh Grisham.

    Secondly, it's a device meaning "somebody" that's a creation of the author. Don't worry about it and don't start "aways" using it.
    Just saw that it's John, not Josh. How foolish of me to keep referring him as Josh.
     
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