Mrs Bolton was caught in the lust as much as Clifford:the more so, as she nearly always lost

longxianchen

Senior Member
chinese
Hi,
Here are some words from the novel Lady Chatterley's Lover(page 314, chapter 15) by Lawrence (planetebook,here):
(background:And every night Clifford played pontoon, that game of the Tommies, with Mrs Bolton, gambling with sixpences……)


And every night now he played pontoon, that game of the Tommies, with Mrs Bolton, gambling with sixpences. And again, in the gambling he was gone in a kind of unconsciousness, or blank intoxication, or intoxication of blankness, whatever it was. Connie could not bear to see him. But when she had gone to bed, he and Mrs Bolton would gamble on till two and three in the morning, safely, and with strange lust. Mrs Bolton was caught in the lust as much as Clifford: the more so, as she nearly always lost.

What's the meaning of the last sentence please? I rephrase is as: Mrs Bolton was trapped in(=was caught) the pleasure(=lust, maybe meaning sexual desire) as much as Clifford: the more so(I totally don't understand what it is), because she almost always lost.
Thank you in advance
 
  • DaylightDelight

    Senior Member
    Japanese - Tokyo
    The lust here is the lust for the game, I believe.
    So I read the sentence as: Mrs.Bolton was trapped in the lust (for the gamble) as much as Clifford: actually her lust for the game was greater than his, because she almost always lost.
     

    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    Thank you a lot.
    But does her lust for the game means the pleasure for the game?
    And we can say: the more, the more… However, I feel here the more is different from it. Is the more the same as more please?
     

    Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    No, lust does not mean pleasure. Please consult the dictionary : a passionate or overwhelming desire or craving.

    The expression here is "the more so", which means "in fact even more".
     
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