MSA/EA: I look forward to seeing you soon. I missed you a lot

Andrew___

Senior Member
May I ask how we could say in MSA and Egyptian dialect the phrase "I look forward to seeing you soon! I missed you a lot".

In MSA can I say أتطلع لرئيك قريباً. اشتقت لك كثيراً

In Egyptian the best I can do is "Nifsy ashoufak orayyeb, washteny awwiy!"

Many thanks.
 
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  • londonmasri

    Senior Member
    English
    I wuold say nifsy ashoufak sounds more like I would like to see you/ I want to see you as opposed to thecasual English 'I look forward'. So I guess if you were tryign to make a point then it could work, as in ' I (really) want to see you...'

    *I have always heard this - 'hanshoufak uraayib inshallah(?)' (question probably works best given arab culture - pretend that you actually want to see them even if you dont :)) or even occasionaly 'hanshoufak qariban', although fus7a, I have heard this a fair bit.

    However I must say that it depends on context. If it is an official appointement you wouldn't say 'hanshoufak uraayib?' (with a question mark) as it wouldn't be appropriate.

    If it's someone you know, and you just want to be polite when ending a conversation, it is very common in Egypt to say 'nesma3 3annak kulli kheer'. Not a direct translation, however this is more custom related I would say.

    *As for wahesteny, this is correct, however I would also like clarification on the forms that the term takes, i.e. I know there is

    wa7shny

    wa7ashteeny, w7ashtiny (what is the difference between these two?)

    wa7ashtuuny

    Also the Amr diab song - 'bitwahashny', what is the meaning here?
     
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    chflb

    Member
    Arabic
    Hello,
    I m sure you have just missed the "ta2":
    أتطلع لرئيتك قريباً. اشتقت لك كثيراً
    :)
     

    Layla_N

    Member
    US
    English (US)
    ٌRegarding the question on different forms of "I miss you" in Egyptian Arabic:

    وحشني waHashni = I miss... (followed by whatever you miss)
    وحشتني waHashteni = I miss you (to a man)
    وحشتيني waHashtiini = I miss you (to a woman)
    وحشتوني waHashtuuni = I miss you (to two or more people)

    Those are all actually the past tense, but they're frequently used with a present-tense meaning. The present-tense conjugations are:

    واحشني waHeshni = I miss you (to a man)
    واحشاني waHshaani = I miss you (to a woman)
    واحشني waHshenni = I miss you (to two or more people)

    I believe those all use the active participle, whereas بتوحشني (betwaHashni - I miss you, to a man) uses the simple present tense.
     

    londonmasri

    Senior Member
    English
    ٌRegarding the question on different forms of "I miss you" in Egyptian Arabic:

    وحشني waHashni = I miss... (followed by whatever you miss)
    وحشتني waHashteni = I miss you (to a man)
    وحشتيني waHashtiini = I miss you (to a woman)
    وحشتوني waHashtuuni = I miss you (to two or more people)

    Those are all actually the past tense, but they're frequently used with a present-tense meaning. The present-tense conjugations are:

    واحشني waHeshni = I miss you (to a man)
    واحشاني waHshaani = I miss you (to a woman)
    واحشني waHshenni = I miss you (to two or more people)

    I believe those all use the active participle, whereas بتوحشني (betwaHashni - I miss you, to a man) uses the simple present tense.
    Thats awesome! Thanks so much Layla!

    Does it matter who is saying it (is it still as above regardless of whether a man or woman says it?)

    Shukran:)
     

    clevermizo

    Senior Member
    English (USA), Spanish
    Thats awesome! Thanks so much Layla!

    Does it matter who is saying it (is it still as above regardless of whether a man or woman says it?)

    Shukran:)
    No, because those forms use -ni as the pronoun, which is genderless. I assume if you wanted to say "he misses her" or "You(m.) miss me" or anything where (in English) the subject of "miss" is gendered, then the forms would change both depending on who misses and whom was missed.
     

    Mahaodeh

    Senior Member
    Arabic, PA and IA.
    Hello,
    I m sure you have just missed the "ta2":
    أتطلع لرئيتك قريباً. اشتقت لك كثيراً
    :)
    It's still wrong, it should be أتطلع لرؤيتك because the raa' has a dhamma which means the hamza should be on a waw. لرئيك as Andrew put it would be liri'ika.
     

    gsc

    Senior Member
    UK
    English
    This is interesting. A friend used this expression, waHashtuuni, to say he missed us but I can't understand why it is past tense.

    He is native Egyptian and he clearly means he IS missing us.

    It's a phrase I would use as we go to Egypt often and am always sad to have to come back to the UK.

    Can anyone give me any example of when to use past tense, present tense and when I should say betwaHashni?

    Also, on a cultural note, could this be misunderstood? I find Egyptian men more 'open' than English men who guard their emotions somewhat but I wouldn't want our young friend to think I was looking for a toyboy;)
     

    Mahaodeh

    Senior Member
    Arabic, PA and IA.
    I believe it has to do with the exact meaning of the word. The maSdar of the verb is wa7sha وَحْشَة, which is a feeling of loneliness and being distant; from the same root is wa7sh (wild). So I think the reason it's used in the past is that it means, at least originally, that being away from him puts him in a state of wa7sha - being alone and distant.

    I think that in EA the meaning shifted a little to mean missing someone but the way it's used (in the past tense) is still common due to the origin.

    That's my 2 cents.
     

    cherine

    Moderator
    Arabic (Egypt).
    Can anyone give me any example of when to use past tense, present tense and when I should say betwaHashni?
    There's no difference -in usage- between the past waHashtiini وحشتيني and waHshaani واحشاني ("I miss you" said to female). Most Egyptians use them interchangeably to mean "I miss you".
    BetewHashni/BetewHashiini is a different thing. It's about a habit or a usual thing:
    Whenever you travel, I miss you.
    بتوحشيني لما بتسافري or لما بتسافري بتوحشيني
    betewHashiini lamma betsafri

    Also, on a cultural note, could this be misunderstood? I find Egyptian men more 'open' than English men who guard their emotions somewhat but I wouldn't want our young friend to think I was looking for a toyboy;)
    If you're friends, and clear about that, then there's nothing to worry about. But it's not very common between women and men to say it because it may be misunderstood for another type of interest in the other person (like I care for you, I like you...). So, the safer for you is to only say it back to those who say it to you, or put it in a general context. Something like: wa7shteni we wa7ashetni maSr. Or, wa7ashtuuni kolloko (I missed you all) if speaking to many persons; this way it would be hard to get misunderstood :)
     
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