Much as you .... there is ...

a.d.a.m

Member
Polish
Natknąłem się na takie zdanie:

Much as you may like him there is a reason why you didn't feel that you should commit to him.

Pytanie 1 - jak to zdanie brzmiałoby po polsku?
Pytanie 2 - czy da się tu wyodrębnić bardziej ogólną konstrukcję, coś w stylu "much as you ..... there is..."? Jeśli tak, jakiej konstrukcj w języku polskim by to odopowiadało?
 
  • LilianaB

    Banned
    Lithuanian
    Niezależnie do jakiego stopnia on ci się podoba, jest powod ze nie chciałas sie z nim zwiazac. This would be one option. It all depends on the context. It may mean somethng else if two man are talking about business matters. Context is key. I think it should be as much as you may like him, though.
     
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    dreamlike

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Hi, Adam

    This is the shortened version of the construction "As much as....." Let me provide you with sample sentences I came up with to enhance your understanding of the phrase.

    (1) As much as I hate to say it, Tom is no good as a husband.
    (2) As much as I like the phrase you have used, I think it doesn't work in the context given.
    (3) As much as I don't want to admit it, I made some mistakes in my life.

    I'd translate the sentence given in the following way: Choć możesz go lubić, jest powód, dla którego nie chciałaś się z nim związać.
     

    LilianaB

    Banned
    Lithuanian
    My translation is 100% correct in a situation where one person is speaking to another about her boyfriend. for example. There is no context, so what would you expect? This is a correct translation in such a scenario. The sentence does not really mean anything without context. Another option would be: Niezaleznie jak bardzo on ci sie podoba, jest powod dla ktorego nie chcialas sie z nim zwiazac. Niezaleznie ze zrobil on na tobie dobre wrazenie jest przyczyna ze nie chcialas/chciales z nim miec bardziej powaznych powiazan. (business)
     
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    dreamlike

    Senior Member
    Polish
    LilianaB said:
    To like, does not mean lubić in this construction.
    Of course it does. This is so glaringly wrong that I'm not even going to waste my time and try to disabuse you of your wrong notion (I would fail to do that, anyway)
     

    POLSKAdoBOJU

    Senior Member
    Canadian English, Polish
    Whenever I read Liliana's butchered attempts at translatiing into Polish I began to question my own knowledge of the language. :confused: I mean the words she writes appear to be Polish, the constructions seem to be Polish, but there's no way in the world that what she attempts to pass off as standard Polish would ever be uttered by any normal native-speaking Pole. It's like she uses an online translator from English into another language, then again from that language into a third language, and again from the third language into Polish and just copies and pastes whatever nonesense it spits out.
     

    LilianaB

    Banned
    Lithuanian
    I agree with one thing, Polska do Boju has said, that the versions of Polish I would choose, may not be the favorite kind that an average person in Poland may choose, especially some people who are in their 20s or early 30s, and who have spent most of their lives in post-communist Poland, or at least grew up there. I don't usually translate into Polish, especially literature, although I could write articles in Polish, but then the choice of words is mine. My translation of a contemporary dialogue in Polish may not sound that authentic. By the way, cool down, Polska do Boju. You sound kind of desperate again. PS. It's nothing like you said, though, about the way of things being teanslated or how they sounded to you. It is more like: Czy bylby Pan taki mily i ugoscil mnie papierosem versus kopsnij szluga.
     
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    dreamlike

    Senior Member
    Polish
    You are deprecating Poland and the Poles again, saying that having grown up in post-communist society has anything to do with the language we use. Your choice of words is mostly wrong, and your last sentence is a case in point:
    LilianaB said:
    Czy bylby Pan taki mily i ugoscil mnie papierosem versus kopsnij szluga.


    I can't conceive of anyone saying "ugościć papierosem" - "poczęstować" would be the word Poles would be most likely to use. You can "ugościć" somebody in your home, showing your hospitality to them. "Kopsnij szluga" is best avoided, and it's used by very few people. It's purely slang expression.
     

    LilianaB

    Banned
    Lithuanian
    Yes, it was a hyperbole to illustrate the problem. I exaggerated a bit to illustrate the point. No bad intentions at all. Many people say ugoscic although poczestowac might be a better choice.
     

    dreamlike

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I've never heard anyone say "ugościć" in this context. People might say "uraczyć" jocularly, for purely humorous purposes (it's too flowery to be used for the mundane thing of asking somebody for a cigarette), but not "ugościć".
     

    LilianaB

    Banned
    Lithuanian
    Yes, you are right, absolutely, Polska do Boju, some Navaho people may even prefer their native language. The choice of anything is an indication of freedom, so really, many people may choose some other words, or phrases.
     

    LilianaB

    Banned
    Lithuanian
    Ugoscic is Eastern: you are right. Some people use it. Poczestowac is a better word, but this was not he point.

    Czy bylby Pan laskaw poczestowac mnie papierosem i mala kanapka z kawiorem.
     

    dreamlike

    Senior Member
    Polish
    People use it jocularly, although I don't find it particularly funny. Note that you have to know a person well if you want to use this expression. If you want to ask a stranger for a cigarette, you would be better off using the normal version :)
     
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