Much to the harm of...

sisedesnonis

Senior Member
Italian-Venetian
Hi everybody, I wonder if this sentence would make sense. Keep in mind that the context is formal/academic
"Voters will have the final say. [...] someone should assess before whether a candidate is fit for election. [...]. And if a dishonest person comes through and is elected, much to the harm of those who made it possible!"
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It’s impossible to answer this properly without more of the text. You’ve omitted the most crucial part — whatever “much to the harm of…” relates to.
     

    sisedesnonis

    Senior Member
    Italian-Venetian
    It’s impossible to answer this properly without more of the text. You’ve omitted the most crucial part — whatever “much to the harm of…” relates to.
    Actually my question was more about if "much to the harm of" means anything at all, because I wasn't able to find this expression, although I remember reading it (and maybe listening too).
    Well, it refers to what follows anyway..."those who made possible that a dishonest person has been elected". I can't understand your question either.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    … if a dishonest person comes through and is elected, much to the harm of those who made it possible!​

    This does not make sense. It would only make sense if the cause of that harm was explained; for example:

    … if a dishonest person came through and was elected, the whole election could be ruled invalid, much to the harm of those who made it possible!​
     

    sisedesnonis

    Senior Member
    Italian-Venetian
    … if a dishonest person comes through and is elected, much to the harm of those who made it possible!​

    This does not make sense. It would only make sense if the cause of that harm was explained; for example:

    … if a dishonest person came through and was elected, the whole election could be ruled invalid, much to the harm of those who made it possible!​
    Oh ok. I'll try to explain it better. The "harm" is yet to come: it will be through his/her policies that they will probably regret voting a dishonest person...
     

    sisedesnonis

    Senior Member
    Italian-Venetian
    I can’t think of a way to sensibly use “much to the harm of” in that context. Can you?
    I don't know:(
    Today in an essay I wrote something along these lines: "If, despite this double-check system, a candidate eventually comes through and is elected, much harm to those who made it possible!"
    Where I meant "it'll be worse for those who made it possible (for the policies he will put into place)"
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    The sentence is lacking words that make it a complete thought. It needs something in one of these two places.

    "If, despite this double-check system, a candidate eventually comes through and is elected, [missing part] much harm [missing part] to those who made it possible!"

    For instance,

    "If, despite this double-check system, a candidate eventually comes through and is elected, much harm will come to those who made it possible!"

    And your original,

    And if a dishonest person comes through and is elected, he will do many bad things, much to the harm detriment of those who made it possible!"
     
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